2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/153171
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Ethical Dimensions Related to Filial Caregiving
Abstract:
Ethical Dimensions Related to Filial Caregiving
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:McCarty, Ellen F., PhD, APRN, BC
P.I. Institution Name:Salve Regina University
Title:Professor
Co-Authors:Constance S. Hendricks, PhD, RN; Denisha L. Hendricks, EdD; Kathleen M. McCarty, SD, MPH and Patrick D. McCarty, DDS
[Research Presentation] Aims: Family caregiving for elder frail relatives has become a normative experience. While much as been written about family caregiving stress, little has been said regarding ethical dimensions of filial responsibility for older family members and their perception of moral demands. Therefore, the aims of this study were to explore the adult child's : 1. Negotiation style, perceptions of the past parent identity, and prior filial relationship; 2. Ethical convictions relative to the caregiving role image; and 3. Expectations relative to caregiving circumstances and goals. Method: Using an interview technique, the grounded theory method, and the Caregiver Appraisal Scale (Gesino & Haas, 2000), a triangulated research design was used to analyze the filial caregiving decision - making process among nine culturally diverse adult children.. Findings: The following categories have emerged from the analysis of interview data: 1. "Choice" and "opportunity"; Positive filial relationship; 2. ôWithout a choiceö: Neutral or ôdarker sideö filial relationship; 3. ôOne last chance to be well regardedö: Conflictual filial relationship; and 4. Values and Perceptions: Negotiation and decision - making. Discussion: This research contributes to the understanding of adult children's acceptance of filial obligations and the reasons by which they persuade themselves to provide care. This study expands the awareness of the interrelationship between the nature of the prior filial relationship, ethical views that underscore their acceptance of filial obligations, and negotiation styles. By uncovering the adult child's sense of rightful filial obligation demands, facilitation of contextual decision - making and setting morally appropriate boundaries may be enhanced - affecting caregiver stress.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEthical Dimensions Related to Filial Caregivingen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/153171-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Ethical Dimensions Related to Filial Caregiving</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">McCarty, Ellen F., PhD, APRN, BC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Salve Regina University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mccartye@salve.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Constance S. Hendricks, PhD, RN; Denisha L. Hendricks, EdD; Kathleen M. McCarty, SD, MPH and Patrick D. McCarty, DDS</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Research Presentation] Aims: Family caregiving for elder frail relatives has become a normative experience. While much as been written about family caregiving stress, little has been said regarding ethical dimensions of filial responsibility for older family members and their perception of moral demands. Therefore, the aims of this study were to explore the adult child's : 1. Negotiation style, perceptions of the past parent identity, and prior filial relationship; 2. Ethical convictions relative to the caregiving role image; and 3. Expectations relative to caregiving circumstances and goals. Method: Using an interview technique, the grounded theory method, and the Caregiver Appraisal Scale (Gesino &amp; Haas, 2000), a triangulated research design was used to analyze the filial caregiving decision - making process among nine culturally diverse adult children.. Findings: The following categories have emerged from the analysis of interview data: 1. &quot;Choice&quot; and &quot;opportunity&quot;; Positive filial relationship; 2. &ocirc;Without a choice&ouml;: Neutral or &ocirc;darker side&ouml; filial relationship; 3. &ocirc;One last chance to be well regarded&ouml;: Conflictual filial relationship; and 4. Values and Perceptions: Negotiation and decision - making. Discussion: This research contributes to the understanding of adult children's acceptance of filial obligations and the reasons by which they persuade themselves to provide care. This study expands the awareness of the interrelationship between the nature of the prior filial relationship, ethical views that underscore their acceptance of filial obligations, and negotiation styles. By uncovering the adult child's sense of rightful filial obligation demands, facilitation of contextual decision - making and setting morally appropriate boundaries may be enhanced - affecting caregiver stress.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:05:28Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:05:28Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.