2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/153180
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Pain free Hospital: Vision or Reality ?
Abstract:
Pain free Hospital: Vision or Reality ?
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:Osterbrink, Juergen, CRNA, MSN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Hospital of Nuremberg
Title:Professor
[Evidence-based Presentation] Aim of investigation: The subject of this study is to evaluate the quality of both process and outcome of pain therapy in patients with acute and chronic pain in a group of 25 German hospitals, in order to identify possible shortcomings of the inter-professional pain treatment. Methods The study was performed as a quasi-experimental pre-post test design. Initially standardized questionnaires for patients, nurses and physicians as well as focused interviews and non interventional observations were used. Results Measurement and documentation of pain were inadequately performed by both nurses (n=4569) and physicians (n=2385). In the patients (n=6076) studied, 35% described their pain at rest as moderate (>3 NRS) and 38% as severe (>6 NRS). During the study period, 80% of surgical patients and 43% of the non-surgical patients and 76% of cancer patients experienced periods of pain. Of the nurses and physicians participating, 65% described no need for changes in their methods of pain treatment. Focused patient education as well as training for the medical and nursing staff increase the quality of the pain treatment. Conclusion In the settings studied pain treatment was suboptimal. The identified causes which hinder effective treatment were: inadequate training, shortcomings of communication and co-operation as well as non-observance of well-known treatment principles. These findings were being used to design medical and nursing interventions, specific for each institution, to improve both the process and outcome of pain therapy.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePain free Hospital: Vision or Reality ?en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/153180-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Pain free Hospital: Vision or Reality ?</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Osterbrink, Juergen, CRNA, MSN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Hospital of Nuremberg</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">josterbrink@aol.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Evidence-based Presentation] Aim of investigation: The subject of this study is to evaluate the quality of both process and outcome of pain therapy in patients with acute and chronic pain in a group of 25 German hospitals, in order to identify possible shortcomings of the inter-professional pain treatment. Methods The study was performed as a quasi-experimental pre-post test design. Initially standardized questionnaires for patients, nurses and physicians as well as focused interviews and non interventional observations were used. Results Measurement and documentation of pain were inadequately performed by both nurses (n=4569) and physicians (n=2385). In the patients (n=6076) studied, 35% described their pain at rest as moderate (&gt;3 NRS) and 38% as severe (&gt;6 NRS). During the study period, 80% of surgical patients and 43% of the non-surgical patients and 76% of cancer patients experienced periods of pain. Of the nurses and physicians participating, 65% described no need for changes in their methods of pain treatment. Focused patient education as well as training for the medical and nursing staff increase the quality of the pain treatment. Conclusion In the settings studied pain treatment was suboptimal. The identified causes which hinder effective treatment were: inadequate training, shortcomings of communication and co-operation as well as non-observance of well-known treatment principles. These findings were being used to design medical and nursing interventions, specific for each institution, to improve both the process and outcome of pain therapy.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:05:50Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:05:50Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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