2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/153186
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Influence of Family-Work and Wartime Stressors on Mental health
Abstract:
Influence of Family-Work and Wartime Stressors on Mental health
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:Pierce, Penny F., PhD, RN, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Michigan
Title:Associate Professor
[Symposium Presentation] Since the Persian Gulf War in 1991, there have been increasing concerns and debate regarding the role of women in combat. Concerns about womenÆs physical and mental resilience, separation from dependent children, and recovery from the trauma of combat have only increased with Operation Iraqi Freedom. Participants consisted of 1,114 Air Force women, deployed during Operation Iraqi Freedom Established scales were used to measure family-work conflict and mental health outcomes including post-traumatic stress disorder, depression, anxiety and role and emotional functioning. The hierarchical regression predicting PTSD symptoms explained 34% of the variance (R2 = .34; F=54.18, p<.001). Deployment in the theater of war (versus elsewhere) and the experience of a greater number of traumatic events were consistent and significant predictors of having more PTSD symptoms (Beta=0.09; t=3.32, p<.001 and Beta=0.45; t=15.51, p<.001, respectively). Family-work conflict was a significant and independent predictor of PTSD. Women reporting greater interference of family responsibilities with military duties reported significantly more PTSD symptoms (Delta R2 = 0.01, p<.001; Beta=.12; t=4.23, p<.001). The dependent variables anxiety, depression, role and emotional functioning, deployment in the theater of war were not a significant predictor. The number of traumatic events was a predictor of mental health outcomes and family-work conflict continued to be an independent predictor of mental health outcomes after controlling for sociodemographic variables and military stressors. The model explained 24% of the variance for depression (R2 = .24; F=33.29, p<.001. Women experiencing greater family-work conflict reported worse functioning (Delta R2 = .02, p<.001; Beta= -0.15.; t=-4.94, p<.001). The salient factor family-work conflict as an independent contributor to self-reported measures of anxiety, depression, post-traumatic stress disorder, and role and emotional functioning was identified. Family-work conflict is a modifiable factor .Disentangling the influence of family and work stressors from non-modifiable combat-related stressors provides an approach to improving post-deployment adjustment and recovery.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleInfluence of Family-Work and Wartime Stressors on Mental healthen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/153186-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Influence of Family-Work and Wartime Stressors on Mental health</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Pierce, Penny F., PhD, RN, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Michigan</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">pfpierce@umich.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Symposium Presentation] Since the Persian Gulf War in 1991, there have been increasing concerns and debate regarding the role of women in combat. Concerns about women&AElig;s physical and mental resilience, separation from dependent children, and recovery from the trauma of combat have only increased with Operation Iraqi Freedom. Participants consisted of 1,114 Air Force women, deployed during Operation Iraqi Freedom Established scales were used to measure family-work conflict and mental health outcomes including post-traumatic stress disorder, depression, anxiety and role and emotional functioning. The hierarchical regression predicting PTSD symptoms explained 34% of the variance (R2 = .34; F=54.18, p&lt;.001). Deployment in the theater of war (versus elsewhere) and the experience of a greater number of traumatic events were consistent and significant predictors of having more PTSD symptoms (Beta=0.09; t=3.32, p&lt;.001 and Beta=0.45; t=15.51, p&lt;.001, respectively). Family-work conflict was a significant and independent predictor of PTSD. Women reporting greater interference of family responsibilities with military duties reported significantly more PTSD symptoms (Delta R2 = 0.01, p&lt;.001; Beta=.12; t=4.23, p&lt;.001). The dependent variables anxiety, depression, role and emotional functioning, deployment in the theater of war were not a significant predictor. The number of traumatic events was a predictor of mental health outcomes and family-work conflict continued to be an independent predictor of mental health outcomes after controlling for sociodemographic variables and military stressors. The model explained 24% of the variance for depression (R2 = .24; F=33.29, p&lt;.001. Women experiencing greater family-work conflict reported worse functioning (Delta R2 = .02, p&lt;.001; Beta= -0.15.; t=-4.94, p&lt;.001). The salient factor family-work conflict as an independent contributor to self-reported measures of anxiety, depression, post-traumatic stress disorder, and role and emotional functioning was identified. Family-work conflict is a modifiable factor .Disentangling the influence of family and work stressors from non-modifiable combat-related stressors provides an approach to improving post-deployment adjustment and recovery.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:06:05Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:06:05Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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