Patient Safety Culture: Toward a New Understanding of Quality Worklife in Critical Care

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/153206
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Patient Safety Culture: Toward a New Understanding of Quality Worklife in Critical Care
Abstract:
Patient Safety Culture: Toward a New Understanding of Quality Worklife in Critical Care
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:Tregunno, Deborah, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:York University
Title:Assistant Professor
[Symposium Presentation] Ensuring that nurses and other health care professionals practice in environments that enable the delivery of safe care is a challenge for today's nurse leaders. This research explores the ways in which the critical care practice environment contributes to, or prevents, the delivery of safe patient care. This study is unique in that it explores the perceptions of multiple direct care providers (e.g. nurses, physicians, other health professionals) simultaneously, as a means of maximizing knowledge about critical care teamwork and the role nurse leaders play in creating quality professional practice environments that support the delivery of safe care. Focus groups data (N=32) was collected from direct care providers (N=197) in 6 critical care units in Ontario, between September 2005 to March, 2006. Qualitative methods are used to explore the meaning and human interactions associated with patient safety and interprofessional teamwork within the context of the critical care setting. Feedback indicates that critical care providers are primarily concerned about threats related to standards of practice, nursing and medical staff competencies, and poor communication and teamwork. The results suggest that, while expert nurses play a critical role in creating conditions of safety for patients, there is an uncomfortable tension between threats that are linked to provider knowledge and experience and those linked to workplace conditions. In the critical care culture of "controlled threat", providers have divergent understandings of the limits of safe performance which influences their ability to consistently defend against potential errors and accidents. Implications for improved patient safety outcomes include the development of "new" nurse leaders and "new" ways of understanding quality worklife in the critical care practice environment.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePatient Safety Culture: Toward a New Understanding of Quality Worklife in Critical Careen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/153206-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Patient Safety Culture: Toward a New Understanding of Quality Worklife in Critical Care</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Tregunno, Deborah, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">York University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">tregunno@yorku.ca</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Symposium Presentation] Ensuring that nurses and other health care professionals practice in environments that enable the delivery of safe care is a challenge for today's nurse leaders. This research explores the ways in which the critical care practice environment contributes to, or prevents, the delivery of safe patient care. This study is unique in that it explores the perceptions of multiple direct care providers (e.g. nurses, physicians, other health professionals) simultaneously, as a means of maximizing knowledge about critical care teamwork and the role nurse leaders play in creating quality professional practice environments that support the delivery of safe care. Focus groups data (N=32) was collected from direct care providers (N=197) in 6 critical care units in Ontario, between September 2005 to March, 2006. Qualitative methods are used to explore the meaning and human interactions associated with patient safety and interprofessional teamwork within the context of the critical care setting. Feedback indicates that critical care providers are primarily concerned about threats related to standards of practice, nursing and medical staff competencies, and poor communication and teamwork. The results suggest that, while expert nurses play a critical role in creating conditions of safety for patients, there is an uncomfortable tension between threats that are linked to provider knowledge and experience and those linked to workplace conditions. In the critical care culture of &quot;controlled threat&quot;, providers have divergent understandings of the limits of safe performance which influences their ability to consistently defend against potential errors and accidents. Implications for improved patient safety outcomes include the development of &quot;new&quot; nurse leaders and &quot;new&quot; ways of understanding quality worklife in the critical care practice environment.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:06:58Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:06:58Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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