Pain Experiences, Control Beliefs, and Coping Strategies in Chinese Elders with Osteoarthritis

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/153208
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Pain Experiences, Control Beliefs, and Coping Strategies in Chinese Elders with Osteoarthritis
Abstract:
Pain Experiences, Control Beliefs, and Coping Strategies in Chinese Elders with Osteoarthritis
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:Tsai, Yun-Fang, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Chang Gung University
Title:Professor
Co-Authors:Tsung-Lan Chu, MS, RN and Yeur-Hur Lai, PhD
[Research Presentation] This study explored pain experiences, control beliefs, and coping strategies among Chinese elders with osteoarthritis. Participants were sampled by convenience from 3 outpatient clinics of a medical center in Taiwan (N=205). A questionnaire was used to collect data on pain sites, pain intensity, pain interference, pain control beliefs, pain coping strategies, depressive tendency, and demographic variables. Scores of worst pain intensity were used to divide participants into 3 groups: mild, moderate, and severe pain. The average number of pain sites was 2.9 (SD=2.2). About 70% of participants suffered moderate to severe worst pain. Participants perceived average pain control beliefs (M=1.7, SD=0.7). Most used pharmacological coping strategies about half the time (M=1.8, SD=0.7), and non-pharmacological strategies about one-fourth of the time (M=1.0, SD=0.5). Non-pharmacological strategies most frequently involved behavioral change. The most frequently used and effective non-pharmacological strategy was "take a rest." Scores of satisfaction with living situation, depressive tendency, pain intensity, pain interference, pain control beliefs, and frequency of using pharmacological coping strategies differed significantly among the 3 pain groups. Regression analysis showed that the intensity of average pain, pain interference with walking, pain interference with sleeping, and pain control beliefs were significant predictors of the intensity of worst pain, explaining 54.0% of the variance in intensity of worst pain. Since health care providers play an important role in helping elders to manage pain, the authors recommend training physicians and nurses to regularly assess pain and to provide current knowledge about pain assessment and management strategies for elders with osteoarthritis. Key words: Pain, elderly, osteoarthritis, belief, coping strategy
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePain Experiences, Control Beliefs, and Coping Strategies in Chinese Elders with Osteoarthritisen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/153208-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Pain Experiences, Control Beliefs, and Coping Strategies in Chinese Elders with Osteoarthritis</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Tsai, Yun-Fang, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Chang Gung University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">yftsai@mail.cgu.edu.tw</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Tsung-Lan Chu, MS, RN and Yeur-Hur Lai, PhD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Research Presentation] This study explored pain experiences, control beliefs, and coping strategies among Chinese elders with osteoarthritis. Participants were sampled by convenience from 3 outpatient clinics of a medical center in Taiwan (N=205). A questionnaire was used to collect data on pain sites, pain intensity, pain interference, pain control beliefs, pain coping strategies, depressive tendency, and demographic variables. Scores of worst pain intensity were used to divide participants into 3 groups: mild, moderate, and severe pain. The average number of pain sites was 2.9 (SD=2.2). About 70% of participants suffered moderate to severe worst pain. Participants perceived average pain control beliefs (M=1.7, SD=0.7). Most used pharmacological coping strategies about half the time (M=1.8, SD=0.7), and non-pharmacological strategies about one-fourth of the time (M=1.0, SD=0.5). Non-pharmacological strategies most frequently involved behavioral change. The most frequently used and effective non-pharmacological strategy was &quot;take a rest.&quot; Scores of satisfaction with living situation, depressive tendency, pain intensity, pain interference, pain control beliefs, and frequency of using pharmacological coping strategies differed significantly among the 3 pain groups. Regression analysis showed that the intensity of average pain, pain interference with walking, pain interference with sleeping, and pain control beliefs were significant predictors of the intensity of worst pain, explaining 54.0% of the variance in intensity of worst pain. Since health care providers play an important role in helping elders to manage pain, the authors recommend training physicians and nurses to regularly assess pain and to provide current knowledge about pain assessment and management strategies for elders with osteoarthritis. Key words: Pain, elderly, osteoarthritis, belief, coping strategy</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:07:03Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:07:03Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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