2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/153212
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Audience Response System: What is the Current Evidence for Utilization?
Abstract:
Audience Response System: What is the Current Evidence for Utilization?
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:Vana, Kimberly, MS, APRN, BC, FNP-C
P.I. Institution Name:Arizona State University
Title:Faculty Associate
Co-Authors:Leslee Shell, MSL
[Symposium Presentation] Active learning techniques have been promoted to dynamically engage students in the attainment and retention of knowledge and skills. Encouraging student participation in large lecture courses can be daunting due to time-constraints and the reticence of pupils to ask or answer questions in front of large groups. Technology can address this need for interactive learning. Specifically, audience response systems (ARS) can be utilized to promote student comprehension and retention by offering each learner several chances to participate in class, anonymously answering questions posed by the instructor.áThus, students become aware of their strengths and weaknesses in regard to course content during the lecture, rather than at testing. The literature suggests that students overwhelmingly prefer classes with audience response systems.áMany authors also advocate that such systems increase student involvement, comprehension, and retention. The literature suggests that students overwhelmingly prefer classes with audience response systems. Many authors also advocate that such systems increase student involvement, comprehension, and retention.áAudience response systems have multiple uses, such as tracking attendance, exploring critical concepts, administering quizzes and exams, gathering and tabulating data, and promoting class discussions.áHowever, such systems create challenges for the instructor.áChallenges include technical problems, writing demanding questions which promote critical thinking, allotting enough time for individual responses and discussion, and modifying lecture content based on those responses.áScientific validation of increased participation, comprehension, and retention is sparse in health education. The purpose of this presentation is to discuss the concept of audience response systems, to identify perceived benefits and challenges of this modality, and to discuss the evidence for utilizing an audience response system to increase student comprehension and retention in healthcare education.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAudience Response System: What is the Current Evidence for Utilization?en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/153212-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Audience Response System: What is the Current Evidence for Utilization?</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Vana, Kimberly, MS, APRN, BC, FNP-C</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Arizona State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Faculty Associate</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">kimberly.vana@asu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Leslee Shell, MSL</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Symposium Presentation] Active learning techniques have been promoted to dynamically engage students in the attainment and retention of knowledge and skills. Encouraging student participation in large lecture courses can be daunting due to time-constraints and the reticence of pupils to ask or answer questions in front of large groups. Technology can address this need for interactive learning. Specifically, audience response systems (ARS) can be utilized to promote student comprehension and retention by offering each learner several chances to participate in class, anonymously answering questions posed by the instructor.&aacute;Thus, students become aware of their strengths and weaknesses in regard to course content during the lecture, rather than at testing. The literature suggests that students overwhelmingly prefer classes with audience response systems.&aacute;Many authors also advocate that such systems increase student involvement, comprehension, and retention. The literature suggests that students overwhelmingly prefer classes with audience response systems. Many authors also advocate that such systems increase student involvement, comprehension, and retention.&aacute;Audience response systems have multiple uses, such as tracking attendance, exploring critical concepts, administering quizzes and exams, gathering and tabulating data, and promoting class discussions.&aacute;However, such systems create challenges for the instructor.&aacute;Challenges include technical problems, writing demanding questions which promote critical thinking, allotting enough time for individual responses and discussion, and modifying lecture content based on those responses.&aacute;Scientific validation of increased participation, comprehension, and retention is sparse in health education. The purpose of this presentation is to discuss the concept of audience response systems, to identify perceived benefits and challenges of this modality, and to discuss the evidence for utilizing an audience response system to increase student comprehension and retention in healthcare education.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:07:12Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:07:12Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.