Perceptions of Children with HIV/AIDS in Two Comparison Populations: Self-Concept and Emotional Indicators

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/153216
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Perceptions of Children with HIV/AIDS in Two Comparison Populations: Self-Concept and Emotional Indicators
Abstract:
Perceptions of Children with HIV/AIDS in Two Comparison Populations: Self-Concept and Emotional Indicators
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:Waweru, Sylvia Muthoni, BSN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Alabama at Birmingham
Title:Honors Nursing Graduate
Co-Authors:Ellen B. Buckner, DSN, RN and Annette Reynolds, MPS, RN, ATR-BC
[Research Presentation] The UN reports 2.6 million children are living with HIV/AIDS, and that with antiretroviral therapies, HIV/AIDS has become a chronic illness. By studying children's perceptions of themselves, their general well-being, psychological functioning and social functioning can be assessed. Transdisciplinary perspectives from collaboration among nursing, art therapy, and counseling were used as a window into the emotional well-being of children. The purpose of this study was to assess perceptions of self-concept and emotional indicators in children living with HIV/AIDS using screening tools applicable across cultures. Children from two comparison populations, USA & Kenya, participated in the study (n = 48). Children were recruited from a clinic setting that cares for children with chronic illness and an orphanage that cares for HIV+ children. Collaboration between institutions in the two countries was initiated and the study was IRB approved in both settings. Self-Concept was measured using a modified Piers-Harris Self-Concept Scale (Cronbach's alpha = 0.68). Emotional indicators were measured from Human Figure Drawings (HFD) by Koppitz recommended for use in screening for children at-risk (Tielsch & Allen, 2005) and drawings were evaluated in consultation with a certified art therapist. Ninety-four percent of children had average or above average self-concept scores. One-third of children in the USA and one-half in Kenya demonstrated significant emotional indicators. The significance of art as a way of assessing emotional health in children from varied cultures was evident. Human Figure Drawings were found to be feasible and an easily accessible way to perform a psychosocial assessment and screening for referral for further assessment and/or counseling. Human figure drawings are of great importance in cross-cultural settings due to universality of expression of emotions. Future studies are needed to determine if art therapy could be used as a regular means of encouraging expressiveness and self-concept development, especially in at-risk children.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePerceptions of Children with HIV/AIDS in Two Comparison Populations: Self-Concept and Emotional Indicatorsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/153216-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Perceptions of Children with HIV/AIDS in Two Comparison Populations: Self-Concept and Emotional Indicators</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Waweru, Sylvia Muthoni, BSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Alabama at Birmingham</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Honors Nursing Graduate</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">sylviamuthoni@yahoo.co.uk</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Ellen B. Buckner, DSN, RN and Annette Reynolds, MPS, RN, ATR-BC</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Research Presentation] The UN reports 2.6 million children are living with HIV/AIDS, and that with antiretroviral therapies, HIV/AIDS has become a chronic illness. By studying children's perceptions of themselves, their general well-being, psychological functioning and social functioning can be assessed. Transdisciplinary perspectives from collaboration among nursing, art therapy, and counseling were used as a window into the emotional well-being of children. The purpose of this study was to assess perceptions of self-concept and emotional indicators in children living with HIV/AIDS using screening tools applicable across cultures. Children from two comparison populations, USA &amp; Kenya, participated in the study (n = 48). Children were recruited from a clinic setting that cares for children with chronic illness and an orphanage that cares for HIV+ children. Collaboration between institutions in the two countries was initiated and the study was IRB approved in both settings. Self-Concept was measured using a modified Piers-Harris Self-Concept Scale (Cronbach's alpha = 0.68). Emotional indicators were measured from Human Figure Drawings (HFD) by Koppitz recommended for use in screening for children at-risk (Tielsch &amp; Allen, 2005) and drawings were evaluated in consultation with a certified art therapist. Ninety-four percent of children had average or above average self-concept scores. One-third of children in the USA and one-half in Kenya demonstrated significant emotional indicators. The significance of art as a way of assessing emotional health in children from varied cultures was evident. Human Figure Drawings were found to be feasible and an easily accessible way to perform a psychosocial assessment and screening for referral for further assessment and/or counseling. Human figure drawings are of great importance in cross-cultural settings due to universality of expression of emotions. Future studies are needed to determine if art therapy could be used as a regular means of encouraging expressiveness and self-concept development, especially in at-risk children.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:07:22Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:07:22Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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