2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/153230
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Impacting Technologies: Exploring the Complexities of RN Work
Abstract:
Impacting Technologies: Exploring the Complexities of RN Work
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:Zuzelo, Patti Rager, EdD, APRN-BC, CS
P.I. Institution Name:La Salle University
Title:Associate Professor & Associate Director of Nursing for Research Albert Einstein Healthcare Network
Co-Authors:Amanda Hansell, MSN, RN, CEN; Linda Thomas, MSN, RN and Catherine Gettis, MSN, RN, C
[Research Presentation] Nurses' work is complex and new technologies are often introduced before systems can adapt. Managing nurse work in sophisticated environments poses threats and opportunities. The purpose of this study was to describe the impact of new technologies on RN practice and the characteristics of technologies that encourage or hinder correct use. New technology was operationally defined as equipment with a computerized component, hardware or software. The research questions were: What are the barriers and facilitators to the use of new technologies in inpatient settings of acute care facilities? How have new technologies affected the patient care practices of bedside nurses? What are the concerns of nurses when introduced to new technologies? Focus group methodology was used to encourage nurses to share perspectives in order to elicit richly descriptive data enhanced by group processes. The study was granted IRB approval. Four focus group sessions were held with purposively selected Registered Nurses (N = 31) from medical-surgical and telemetry units. Data were thematically analyzed. The positive aspects of technology themes included: improving practice tasks, improving patient outcomes; and, enhancing the practice environment. Negative aspects of technology were revealed as systems gaps, failing equipment, and education deficits. Nurses described serving as technology mediators and having a love-hate relationship with technology. Nurses were compelled to rely on non-responsive ancillary departments and were challenged by poorly working systems. Participants described the qualities of new technologies that encouraged them to use equipment properly versus improperly. Nurses noted that age-related changes, physical and cognitive, impacted on technology use. Participants described increasingly fragmented care with a need for improved inter-departmental cooperation. Nurses developed strategies for working around systems and chose to bypass some safety mechanisms. Practice implications and recommendations include the need for well-planned systems and regularly conducted evaluations following the introduction of new technologies into care systems.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleImpacting Technologies: Exploring the Complexities of RN Worken_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/153230-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Impacting Technologies: Exploring the Complexities of RN Work</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Zuzelo, Patti Rager, EdD, APRN-BC, CS</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">La Salle University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor &amp; Associate Director of Nursing for Research Albert Einstein Healthcare Network</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">zuzelo@lasalle.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Amanda Hansell, MSN, RN, CEN; Linda Thomas, MSN, RN and Catherine Gettis, MSN, RN, C</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Research Presentation] Nurses' work is complex and new technologies are often introduced before systems can adapt. Managing nurse work in sophisticated environments poses threats and opportunities. The purpose of this study was to describe the impact of new technologies on RN practice and the characteristics of technologies that encourage or hinder correct use. New technology was operationally defined as equipment with a computerized component, hardware or software. The research questions were: What are the barriers and facilitators to the use of new technologies in inpatient settings of acute care facilities? How have new technologies affected the patient care practices of bedside nurses? What are the concerns of nurses when introduced to new technologies? Focus group methodology was used to encourage nurses to share perspectives in order to elicit richly descriptive data enhanced by group processes. The study was granted IRB approval. Four focus group sessions were held with purposively selected Registered Nurses (N = 31) from medical-surgical and telemetry units. Data were thematically analyzed. The positive aspects of technology themes included: improving practice tasks, improving patient outcomes; and, enhancing the practice environment. Negative aspects of technology were revealed as systems gaps, failing equipment, and education deficits. Nurses described serving as technology mediators and having a love-hate relationship with technology. Nurses were compelled to rely on non-responsive ancillary departments and were challenged by poorly working systems. Participants described the qualities of new technologies that encouraged them to use equipment properly versus improperly. Nurses noted that age-related changes, physical and cognitive, impacted on technology use. Participants described increasingly fragmented care with a need for improved inter-departmental cooperation. Nurses developed strategies for working around systems and chose to bypass some safety mechanisms. Practice implications and recommendations include the need for well-planned systems and regularly conducted evaluations following the introduction of new technologies into care systems.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:07:57Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:07:57Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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