2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/153296
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Delivery of Mental Health Services on Long Island College Campuses
Abstract:
The Delivery of Mental Health Services on Long Island College Campuses
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2006
Author:Sanders, Lorraine, NP, CNM, DNSc
P.I. Institution Name:Hunter Bellevue School of Nursing
Title:Associate Professor
A recent survey (n=19,947) conducted by American College Health Association found that 15.7% of female students and 8.5% of male students had previously been diagnosed with depression and that depression and/or anxiety were impediments to their academic performance. Young adults attending university or college are often away from home for the first time and may experience a lack of social support, which can contribute to feelings of hopelessness and helplessness. Students are also expected, as young adults, to manage health issues that affect them but they may not have the skills to seek care when symptoms arise and/or worsen. Additionally, information about a student's health status when seeking care may not be relayed to family members due to privacy laws about health information even in the event of a mental health crisis. Little data exists to describe the delivery of mental health services on college campuses and how student health information is managed when seeking mental health services or during a mental health crisis. Objectives: to describe the delivery and management of mental health services on Long Island, NY college campuses. Methods: a survey of directors of college health services (n=30) with a response rate of 33% (n=10). Findings: Thirty percent of respondents delivered mental health services on campus. Psychologists and registered nurses were the first line responders providing triage to students with mental health problems. Many (70%) did not offer evaluation and/or treatment on a 24-hour basis. Fifty percent (n=5) did not notify family in the event of a mental health crisis. Conclusion: College health centers are delivering mental health services to a population in need however further research is needed to determine best practices in the delivery of care and how to use the university setting to promote mental health.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Delivery of Mental Health Services on Long Island College Campusesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/153296-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Delivery of Mental Health Services on Long Island College Campuses</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Sanders, Lorraine, NP, CNM, DNSc </td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Hunter Bellevue School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">lsanders@optonline.net</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">A recent survey (n=19,947) conducted by American College Health Association found that 15.7% of female students and 8.5% of male students had previously been diagnosed with depression and that depression and/or anxiety were impediments to their academic performance. Young adults attending university or college are often away from home for the first time and may experience a lack of social support, which can contribute to feelings of hopelessness and helplessness. Students are also expected, as young adults, to manage health issues that affect them but they may not have the skills to seek care when symptoms arise and/or worsen. Additionally, information about a student's health status when seeking care may not be relayed to family members due to privacy laws about health information even in the event of a mental health crisis. Little data exists to describe the delivery of mental health services on college campuses and how student health information is managed when seeking mental health services or during a mental health crisis. Objectives: to describe the delivery and management of mental health services on Long Island, NY college campuses. Methods: a survey of directors of college health services (n=30) with a response rate of 33% (n=10). Findings: Thirty percent of respondents delivered mental health services on campus. Psychologists and registered nurses were the first line responders providing triage to students with mental health problems. Many (70%) did not offer evaluation and/or treatment on a 24-hour basis. Fifty percent (n=5) did not notify family in the event of a mental health crisis. Conclusion: College health centers are delivering mental health services to a population in need however further research is needed to determine best practices in the delivery of care and how to use the university setting to promote mental health.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:10:41Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:10:41Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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