Compassionate Caring in Bloomsburg University Nursing Students: Innate or Learned?

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/153312
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Compassionate Caring in Bloomsburg University Nursing Students: Innate or Learned?
Abstract:
Compassionate Caring in Bloomsburg University Nursing Students: Innate or Learned?
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2006
Author:Verosky, Pamela S.
P.I. Institution Name:Bloomsburg University of Pennsylvania
Title:Undergraduate Nursing Student, Primary Researcher
Co-Authors:M. Christine Alichnie, PhD, RN
Caring is considered by many to be an essential attribute to the nursing  profession.  When describing nursing, the first characteristic which comes to mind is the  caring nature by the professional nurse. Although nursing has evolved over the years with many advances, the public continues to describe nurses as compassionate caregivers. But how and when do nurses learn the art of caring and exhibit it with their patients? Is caring an innate quality?  Or is it an aspect of one?s personality that can be taught or nurtured through professional socialization?  Through exposure to the professional culture and practice of nursing, students are socialized into professional nursing based on the beliefs and values of their role models.   This study intended to explore caring attributes in nursing students and the perceived level of caring by their patients. The purposes of this quantitative, panel-survey research study were twofold:  1) to determine if there was a positive correlation between Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) personality types and patient satisfaction with care provided by Bloomsburg University nursing students; and, 2) to determine if there was a positive correlation between the students? progression between the first hospital clinical experience of the third year and the end of third year with the development of a more caring MBTI personality type. Patient satisfaction was measured by a Patient Satisfaction Survey. Results from each semester were compared to determine if students? personality types changed, and if this change could possibly be attributed to progression through the curriculum with more exposure to their faculty role models. One goal of the curriculum is to develop students with caring compassion and clinical excellence. Data were analyzed to determine if certain MBTI types yielded a higher patient satisfaction score than others. Results will be finalized in spring 2006 and included in the poster presentation.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCompassionate Caring in Bloomsburg University Nursing Students: Innate or Learned?en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/153312-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Compassionate Caring in Bloomsburg University Nursing Students: Innate or Learned?</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Verosky, Pamela S.</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Bloomsburg University of Pennsylvania</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Undergraduate Nursing Student, Primary Researcher</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">pamelasverosky@yahoo.com</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">M. Christine Alichnie, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Caring is considered by many to be an essential attribute to the nursing&nbsp; profession. &nbsp;When describing nursing, the first characteristic which comes to mind is the &nbsp;caring nature by the professional nurse. Although nursing has evolved over the years with many advances, the public continues to describe nurses as compassionate caregivers. But how and when do nurses learn the art of caring and exhibit it with their patients? Is caring an innate quality? &nbsp;Or is it an aspect of one?s personality that can be taught or nurtured through professional socialization? &nbsp;Through exposure to the professional culture and practice of nursing, students are socialized into professional nursing based on the beliefs and values of their role models.&nbsp;&nbsp; This study intended to explore caring attributes in nursing students and the perceived level of caring by their patients. The purposes of this quantitative, panel-survey research study were twofold: &nbsp;1) to determine if there was a positive correlation between Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) personality types and patient satisfaction with care provided by Bloomsburg University nursing students; and, 2) to determine if there was a positive correlation between the students? progression between the first hospital clinical experience of the third year and the end of third year with the development of a more caring MBTI personality type. Patient satisfaction was measured by a Patient Satisfaction Survey. Results from each semester were compared to determine if students? personality types changed, and if this change could possibly be attributed to progression through the curriculum with more exposure to their faculty role models. One goal of the curriculum is to develop students with caring compassion and clinical excellence. Data were analyzed to determine if certain MBTI types yielded a higher patient satisfaction score than others. Results will be finalized in spring 2006 and included in the poster presentation.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:11:19Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:11:19Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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