2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/153318
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Caring for Aging Chinese: Lessons Learned from America
Abstract:
Caring for Aging Chinese: Lessons Learned from America
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2006
Author:Wan, Hongwei, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Shanghai Second Medical University
Title:Associate Professor
Co-Authors:Fang Yu, PhD, RN, CRNP; Ann Kolanowski, RN, PhD
Background: After two birth peaks and the implementation of ?one-child? family plan in last century, China is facing an unprecedented challenge for meeting the aging care needs. Older Chinese will triple and account for 25% of total population by 2050. Purpose: To historically analyze the trend of aging and services available for older Chinese and Americans, and to provide suggestions for Chinese using lessons learned from America. Method: Electronic databases including PubMed, CINAHL, Weipu and Wanfang were searched from 1980 to 2005, using keywords: aging population, aging nursing, health care policy, China, America. Findings: Three broad themes emerged from literatures. First, family support has been the most important way of caring for older Chinese. The ?4-2-1? family structure which resulted from ?one-child? family plan will undermine the viability of this traditional way in the upcoming decades. Second, older Chinese are increasingly relying on self care due to growing ?empty nests? associated with modernization and the ?4-2-1? family structure. Lack of financial security and high prevalence of morbidity pose serious threats to their self-care abilities. Last, social supports are only available to the privileged few who reside in cities where pensions and health insurance are available. Eighty percent of older Chinese live in rural areas where little social support is available. Discussions: The development of American gerontological nursing offers three lessons for China to meet the needs of its mounting older population. First, add gerontological content to nursing education to jump start nurses? competence for aging. Second, develop community-based models suitable for Chinese culture and economic status, including home care, assisted living, nursing home and aging in place. Third, advocate for the reform and implementation of regionally specific social security system. Implications: Nursing curriculum reform with gerontology focus and community-based models are pivotal for addressing the upcoming social crisis in China.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCaring for Aging Chinese: Lessons Learned from Americaen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/153318-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Caring for Aging Chinese: Lessons Learned from America</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Wan, Hongwei, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Shanghai Second Medical University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">huw5@psu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Fang Yu, PhD, RN, CRNP; Ann Kolanowski, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: After two birth peaks and the implementation of ?one-child? family plan in last century, China is facing an unprecedented challenge for meeting the aging care needs. Older Chinese will triple and account for 25% of total population by 2050. Purpose: To historically analyze the trend of aging and services available for older Chinese and Americans, and to provide suggestions for Chinese using lessons learned from America. Method: Electronic databases including PubMed, CINAHL, Weipu and Wanfang were searched from 1980 to 2005, using keywords: aging population, aging nursing, health care policy, China, America. Findings: Three broad themes emerged from literatures. First, family support has been the most important way of caring for older Chinese. The ?4-2-1? family structure which resulted from ?one-child? family plan will undermine the viability of this traditional way in the upcoming decades. Second, older Chinese are increasingly relying on self care due to growing ?empty nests? associated with modernization and the ?4-2-1? family structure. Lack of financial security and high prevalence of morbidity pose serious threats to their self-care abilities. Last, social supports are only available to the privileged few who reside in cities where pensions and health insurance are available. Eighty percent of older Chinese live in rural areas where little social support is available. Discussions: The development of American gerontological nursing offers three lessons for China to meet the needs of its mounting older population. First, add gerontological content to nursing education to jump start nurses? competence for aging. Second, develop community-based models suitable for Chinese culture and economic status, including home care, assisted living, nursing home and aging in place. Third, advocate for the reform and implementation of regionally specific social security system. Implications: Nursing curriculum reform with gerontology focus and community-based models are pivotal for addressing the upcoming social crisis in China.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:11:34Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:11:34Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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