2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/153320
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Impact of School Nurse Intervention on Student Health and Attendance
Abstract:
Impact of School Nurse Intervention on Student Health and Attendance
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2006
Author:Weismuller, Penny C., DrPH, RN
P.I. Institution Name:California State University, Fullerton
Title:Assistant Professor
Co-Authors:Merry A. Grasska, MPH, RN, NP-C; Marilyn Alexander, RN, BSN, PHN; Patricia S. Kramer, BA, RN
Children in poor health are seven times more likely to miss 11 or more school days a year due to injury or illness than children in good health (Day & Bloom, 2005). Student absenteeism rates appear to have a direct correlation to academic performance (Chan, 2002). Previous research has documented the helpfulness of increased nurse ratios and students staying in school, especially related to students with chronic illnesses (Allen, 2003, Fryer & Igoe, 1995). Two studies demonstrate that school nurses (SN) influence student attendance (Kimel, 1995; Long et al., 1975). These studies have not defined which nursing interventions are most effective in addressing absenteeism. The purpose of this project is to describe the impact of school nursing interventions on student attendance and student health conditions through a retrospective record review of 500 randomly selected elementary school students. The data collection tool was developed with input and review by experienced SNs and nurse faculty. The Nurse Intervention Classification set will be used to code nurse interventions. Sample interventions likely to be used by school nurses are multidisciplinary care conferences, health screenings, referrals, and medication management. The School Administrative Student Information system will be used to identify numbers, types and dates of student absences. Data collection in two school districts will be conducted in January 2006. Experienced nursing staff will conduct the record reviews and data collection. Analysis of the first 100 cases will be included in the poster presentation, including effect of SN interventions on student attendance and on referral health conditions (e.g., asthma, cardiac diagnoses, seizures, diabetes and emotional-behavioral problems.) Evidence of nursing impact is critical in advocating for school nursing services. This study adds information about student attendance outcomes of SN intervention, which is missing from current literature.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleImpact of School Nurse Intervention on Student Health and Attendanceen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/153320-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Impact of School Nurse Intervention on Student Health and Attendance</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Weismuller, Penny C., DrPH, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">California State University, Fullerton</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">pweismuller@fullerton.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Merry A. Grasska, MPH, RN, NP-C; Marilyn Alexander, RN, BSN, PHN; Patricia S. Kramer, BA, RN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Children in poor health are seven times more likely to miss 11 or more school days a year due to injury or illness than children in good health (Day &amp; Bloom, 2005). Student absenteeism rates appear to have a direct correlation to academic performance (Chan, 2002). Previous research has documented the helpfulness of increased nurse ratios and students staying in school, especially related to students with chronic illnesses (Allen, 2003, Fryer &amp; Igoe, 1995). Two studies demonstrate that school nurses (SN) influence student attendance (Kimel, 1995; Long et al., 1975). These studies have not defined which nursing interventions are most effective in addressing absenteeism. The purpose of this project is to describe the impact of school nursing interventions on student attendance and student health conditions through a retrospective record review of 500 randomly selected elementary school students. The data collection tool was developed with input and review by experienced SNs and nurse faculty. The Nurse Intervention Classification set will be used to code nurse interventions. Sample interventions likely to be used by school nurses are multidisciplinary care conferences, health screenings, referrals, and medication management. The School Administrative Student Information system will be used to identify numbers, types and dates of student absences. Data collection in two school districts will be conducted in January 2006. Experienced nursing staff will conduct the record reviews and data collection. Analysis of the first 100 cases will be included in the poster presentation, including effect of SN interventions on student attendance and on referral health conditions (e.g., asthma, cardiac diagnoses, seizures, diabetes and emotional-behavioral problems.) Evidence of nursing impact is critical in advocating for school nursing services. This study adds information about student attendance outcomes of SN intervention, which is missing from current literature.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:11:39Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:11:39Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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