2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/153327
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Looking for the Oracle: Ethical Dilemmas of Mid-Career Nurses
Abstract:
Looking for the Oracle: Ethical Dilemmas of Mid-Career Nurses
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2006
Author:Young, Anne, EdD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Texas Woman's University
Title:Professor and Doctoral Program Coordinator
Co-Authors:Karen Hahn, RN, ANP, MSN; Patricia Gail Bray, PhD
Making decisions regarding ethical issues is a constant in nursing practice.  Although nurses routinely face ethical problems, educational preparation to facilitate dilemma resolution is limited.  While some nursing programs systematically incorporate ethics as a part of the curriculum, most nurses feel unprepared for the ethical dilemmas encountered in practice. This sense of being poorly equipped can extend into practice despite substantial clinical expertise gained through out careers. Purpose:  To gain insight into how mid-career nurses define and respond to ethical dilemmas, qualitative focus groups were used with small groups of nurse leaders in the southwestern United States. Fifteen nursing doctoral students, ranging in age from their mid-thirties to late fifties, participated in focus group discussions regarding experiences with ethical dilemmas in nursing practice. These well-seasoned nurses functioned in practice roles as clinical specialists, nurse practitioners, administrators, and educators. Method: Focus group exercises for this study were based on a community-based participatory research (CBPR) model which was adapted to include a series of qualitative-based, iterative exercises designed to encourage dialogue about how mid-career nurses defined and responded to ethical dilemmas and the obstacles to dilemma resolution.  Findings: Mid-career nurses characterized ethical dilemmas as ?ones you never forget,? charged with emotional intensity and conflict.  Participants viewed ethical dilemmas differently than other practice problems noting there was ?no oracle to go to.? Participants had energetic discussion around barriers to resolution, sharing previously undisclosed and unresolved dilemmas.  While mid-career nurses drew on a greater number of resources for dilemma resolution, they still felt considerable anguish.  Discussion: Although mid-career nurses identified similar ethical dilemmas as less experienced nurses, they possessed more sophisticated mechanisms for resolution. However, dilemmas still possessed a gut wrenching emotional impact that made some consider leaving nursing positions. Information seeking and dialogue posed the most potent methods for approaching dilemma resolution.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleLooking for the Oracle: Ethical Dilemmas of Mid-Career Nursesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/153327-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Looking for the Oracle: Ethical Dilemmas of Mid-Career Nurses</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Young, Anne, EdD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Texas Woman's University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor and Doctoral Program Coordinator</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">eyoung@twu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Karen Hahn, RN, ANP, MSN; Patricia Gail Bray, PhD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Making decisions regarding ethical issues is a constant in nursing practice.&nbsp; Although nurses routinely face ethical problems, educational preparation to facilitate dilemma resolution is limited.&nbsp; While some nursing programs systematically incorporate ethics as a part of the curriculum, most nurses feel unprepared for the ethical dilemmas encountered in practice. This sense of being poorly equipped can extend into practice despite substantial clinical expertise gained through out careers. Purpose:&nbsp; To gain insight into how mid-career nurses define and respond to ethical dilemmas, qualitative focus groups were used with small groups of nurse leaders in the southwestern United States. Fifteen nursing doctoral students, ranging in age from their mid-thirties to late fifties, participated in focus group discussions regarding experiences with ethical dilemmas in nursing practice. These well-seasoned nurses functioned in practice roles as clinical specialists, nurse practitioners, administrators, and educators. Method: Focus group exercises for this study were based on a community-based participatory research (CBPR) model which was adapted to include a series of qualitative-based, iterative exercises designed to encourage dialogue about how mid-career nurses defined and responded to ethical dilemmas and the obstacles to dilemma resolution.&nbsp; Findings: Mid-career nurses characterized ethical dilemmas as ?ones you never forget,? charged with emotional intensity and conflict.&nbsp; Participants viewed ethical dilemmas differently than other practice problems noting there was ?no oracle to go to.? Participants had energetic discussion around barriers to resolution, sharing previously undisclosed and unresolved dilemmas.&nbsp; While mid-career nurses drew on a greater number of resources for dilemma resolution, they still felt considerable anguish.&nbsp; Discussion: Although mid-career nurses identified similar ethical dilemmas as less experienced nurses, they possessed more sophisticated mechanisms for resolution. However, dilemmas still possessed a gut wrenching emotional impact that made some consider leaving nursing positions. Information seeking and dialogue posed the most potent methods for approaching dilemma resolution.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:11:56Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:11:56Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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