Attitudes Toward the Elderly and Knowledge of Aging as Correlates to the Willingness and Intention to Work with Elderly Among Saudi Nursing Students

17.00
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/153329
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Attitudes Toward the Elderly and Knowledge of Aging as Correlates to the Willingness and Intention to Work with Elderly Among Saudi Nursing Students
Abstract:
Attitudes Toward the Elderly and Knowledge of Aging as Correlates to the Willingness and Intention to Work with Elderly Among Saudi Nursing Students
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2006
Author:Zakari, Nazik, PhD, RN, MSN, BSN
P.I. Institution Name:King Saud University
Title:Assistant Professor
Rapid socioeconomic growth and increased life expectancy due to improvements in medical treatments and social services are contributors to the increase in the elderly population in Saudi Arabia. This study examined the relationships among the attitudes of Saudi nursing students toward the elderly, their knowledge of aging, their willingness to take care of the elderly, their academic level of study, and their intention to work with the elderly. In addition, the study determined factors that were most influential in predicting intent to work with the elderly, and identified the work preferences. This study demonstrates a cross-sectional research design with qualitative components. Quota proportional sample of 506 nurse respondents completed the survey from three regions. Modified Kogan Attitude Toward Old People Scale; Modified Facts on Aging Quiz 2; Modified Elderly Patient Care Inventory; Intent to Work with the Elderly Scale; and demographic data sheet were used. A triangulated data analysis was applied. An Interpretative Meta-Matrix Approach Analysis was used for the qualitative data analysis. Quantitative findings indicated: (1) The Saudi nursing student lack basic knowledge of aging; (2) showed moderate intention to work with the elderly; they held favorable attitudes, and expressed interest in and willingness to take care of the elderly; (3) a significant correlation between the students intent to work with the elderly, their willingness to take care of the elderly and their attitudes toward the elderly; and (4) the student willingness to take care of the elderly and their attitudes were the factors influencing their intention. The qualitative portion revealed three composite themes: Building on a Strong Foundation, Incentive in Elder Care, and Impressions of Context of Care. The students with indeterminate perception and experiences, discomfort with the aging process, or a perceived lack of knowledge were more likely to rank elder care as their lowest work preference.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAttitudes Toward the Elderly and Knowledge of Aging as Correlates to the Willingness and Intention to Work with Elderly Among Saudi Nursing Studentsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/153329-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Attitudes Toward the Elderly and Knowledge of Aging as Correlates to the Willingness and Intention to Work with Elderly Among Saudi Nursing Students</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Zakari, Nazik, PhD, RN, MSN, BSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">King Saud University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">nzakari@hotmail.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Rapid socioeconomic growth and increased life expectancy due to improvements in medical treatments and social services are contributors to the increase in the elderly population in Saudi Arabia. This study examined the relationships among the attitudes of Saudi nursing students toward the elderly, their knowledge of aging, their willingness to take care of the elderly, their academic level of study, and their intention to work with the elderly. In addition, the study determined factors that were most influential in predicting intent to work with the elderly, and identified the work preferences. This study demonstrates a cross-sectional research design with qualitative components. Quota proportional sample of 506 nurse respondents completed the survey from three regions. Modified Kogan Attitude Toward Old People Scale; Modified Facts on Aging Quiz 2; Modified Elderly Patient Care Inventory; Intent to Work with the Elderly Scale; and demographic data sheet were used. A triangulated data analysis was applied. An Interpretative Meta-Matrix Approach Analysis was used for the qualitative data analysis. Quantitative findings indicated: (1) The Saudi nursing student lack basic knowledge of aging; (2) showed moderate intention to work with the elderly; they held favorable attitudes, and expressed interest in and willingness to take care of the elderly; (3) a significant correlation between the students intent to work with the elderly, their willingness to take care of the elderly and their attitudes toward the elderly; and (4) the student willingness to take care of the elderly and their attitudes were the factors influencing their intention. The qualitative portion revealed three composite themes: Building on a Strong Foundation, Incentive in Elder Care, and Impressions of Context of Care. The students with indeterminate perception and experiences, discomfort with the aging process, or a perceived lack of knowledge were more likely to rank elder care as their lowest work preference.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:12:00Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:12:00Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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