Smoking/Drinking Habits Related to Nausea and Vomiting in Pregnant Aborigines

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/153358
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Smoking/Drinking Habits Related to Nausea and Vomiting in Pregnant Aborigines
Abstract:
Smoking/Drinking Habits Related to Nausea and Vomiting in Pregnant Aborigines
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:Chou, Fan-Hao, RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Kaohsiung Medical University
Title:Associate Professor
Co-Authors:Mei-Sang Yang, PhD and Shih-Hsien Kuo, RPh, PhD
[Research Presentation] Objective: To investigate the association among smoking, drinking and pregnancy-related nausea and vomiting in Taiwanese aboriginal women. Design: A cross-sectional survey was conducted. Sample and measurements: A total of 901 aboriginal women were recruited into this study from ten hospitals and completed a structured questionnaire about demographic and obstetric information, smoking history, and alcohol drinking habits. Results: The prevalence of maternal smoking and drinking were 22.8% (n = 201) and 31.9% (n = 287) respectively. Multiple logistic regression controlled by age in years showed that the amount of more than '10' cigarettes per day before and during pregnancy were two risk factors for pregnancy- related nausea and vomiting (AORs = 1.74 and 2.77, respectively). The amount of smoking indicated that more than æ10Æ cigarettes per day showed significant risk for N/V. Conclusions: Smoking is related, in a dose-response effect, to pregnancy-related nausea and vomiting. Reducing the amount of cigarettes could decrease the risk of N/V and further decrease adverse pregnancy and birth outcome. Further research could determine the additive effects of smoking, drinking, and N/V on adverse pregnancy and birth outcome.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSmoking/Drinking Habits Related to Nausea and Vomiting in Pregnant Aboriginesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/153358-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Smoking/Drinking Habits Related to Nausea and Vomiting in Pregnant Aborigines</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Chou, Fan-Hao, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Kaohsiung Medical University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">fanhao@kmu.edu.tw</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Mei-Sang Yang, PhD and Shih-Hsien Kuo, RPh, PhD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Research Presentation] Objective: To investigate the association among smoking, drinking and pregnancy-related nausea and vomiting in Taiwanese aboriginal women. Design: A cross-sectional survey was conducted. Sample and measurements: A total of 901 aboriginal women were recruited into this study from ten hospitals and completed a structured questionnaire about demographic and obstetric information, smoking history, and alcohol drinking habits. Results: The prevalence of maternal smoking and drinking were 22.8% (n = 201) and 31.9% (n = 287) respectively. Multiple logistic regression controlled by age in years showed that the amount of more than '10' cigarettes per day before and during pregnancy were two risk factors for pregnancy- related nausea and vomiting (AORs = 1.74 and 2.77, respectively). The amount of smoking indicated that more than &aelig;10&AElig; cigarettes per day showed significant risk for N/V. Conclusions: Smoking is related, in a dose-response effect, to pregnancy-related nausea and vomiting. Reducing the amount of cigarettes could decrease the risk of N/V and further decrease adverse pregnancy and birth outcome. Further research could determine the additive effects of smoking, drinking, and N/V on adverse pregnancy and birth outcome.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:13:10Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:13:10Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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