Emotional Intelligence: Enhancing Empathy for Mental Health Patients an Evidence Based Approach

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/153367
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Emotional Intelligence: Enhancing Empathy for Mental Health Patients an Evidence Based Approach
Abstract:
Emotional Intelligence: Enhancing Empathy for Mental Health Patients an Evidence Based Approach
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:Dearing, Karen, PhD, APRN-c
P.I. Institution Name:Brigham Young University
Title:instructor
[Research Presentation] Stigmatization and shaming of individuals with mental illness has endured throughout history. In fact, the media regularly perpetuate the problem of stigma with images that portray those with mental illness being violent, out of control, dangerous, and unpredictable.á Nurses enter the workforce with their own biases and stereotyping of mental illness, which were influenced by those images.áAn evidenced-based interactive exercise was introduced for nurse participants to experience symptoms/behaviors associated with serious and persistent mental illness to affect intellectual empathy towards those with mental illness. The study participants were introduced to a 90 minute exercise of "voice simulation" using audiotapes of distressing voices. While listening to audiotapes simulating the hearing of distressing voices the participants were engaged in an individual mental status exam, a structured group activity, and cognitive testing. The 11-item Medical Condition Regard Scale (MCRS) was administered pre and post simulation to identify participant's attitudes and health care related behaviors.áParticipants then discussed their perceptions in a focus group. Study results of changes in the MCRS scores demonstrate significant differences in the participant's regard for patients with serious and persistent mental illness. Focus group themes centered on having an increased ability to accurately understand the viewpoint and reasoning of those with a serious mental illness. Themes include: "Kind of Lost", "Who Cares", "Get Away", "Worn Out", "Feel Things Out", and "Conscientious Caregiver". áParticipants describe the influence of this exercise and the change that occurs personally in their understanding of what it means to be ill and hear voices, impacting their emotional intelligence.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEmotional Intelligence: Enhancing Empathy for Mental Health Patients an Evidence Based Approachen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/153367-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Emotional Intelligence: Enhancing Empathy for Mental Health Patients an Evidence Based Approach</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Dearing, Karen, PhD, APRN-c</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Brigham Young University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">instructor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Karen_Dearing@byu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Research Presentation] Stigmatization and shaming of individuals with mental illness has endured throughout history. In fact, the media regularly perpetuate the problem of stigma with images that portray those with mental illness being violent, out of control, dangerous, and unpredictable.&aacute; Nurses enter the workforce with their own biases and stereotyping of mental illness, which were influenced by those images.&aacute;An evidenced-based interactive exercise was introduced for nurse participants to experience symptoms/behaviors associated with serious and persistent mental illness to affect intellectual empathy towards those with mental illness. The study participants were introduced to a 90 minute exercise of &quot;voice simulation&quot; using audiotapes of distressing voices. While listening to audiotapes simulating the hearing of distressing voices the participants were engaged in an individual mental status exam, a structured group activity, and cognitive testing. The 11-item Medical Condition Regard Scale (MCRS) was administered pre and post simulation to identify participant's attitudes and health care related behaviors.&aacute;Participants then discussed their perceptions in a focus group. Study results of changes in the MCRS scores demonstrate significant differences in the participant's regard for patients with serious and persistent mental illness. Focus group themes centered on having an increased ability to accurately understand the viewpoint and reasoning of those with a serious mental illness. Themes include: &quot;Kind of Lost&quot;, &quot;Who Cares&quot;, &quot;Get Away&quot;, &quot;Worn Out&quot;, &quot;Feel Things Out&quot;, and &quot;Conscientious Caregiver&quot;. &aacute;Participants describe the influence of this exercise and the change that occurs personally in their understanding of what it means to be ill and hear voices, impacting their emotional intelligence.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:13:32Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:13:32Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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