2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/153378
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The State of the Science Around the Pain Resource Nurse Role
Abstract:
The State of the Science Around the Pain Resource Nurse Role
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:Griffin, Emily, RN, MN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Iowa Hospital and Clinics
Title:Advanced Practice Nurse
[Evidence-based Presentation] One very important step of evidence-based practice is facilitating a practice change.áThis is also known as adoption of the practice change.áWe know that the way in which the practice change is communicated, can affect the adoption of that idea.áWe also know that education alone does not increase the adoption rate. Methods that involve more than one implementation strategy, such as use of change champions and opinion leaders, are found to be very effective (Oxman, 1995). Pain management is one example of where the evidence is available (through research and guidelines for best practice), but nurses are still lacking knowledge about best practice around pain.áNurses have varying degrees of training around pain in their nursing school courses, and within organizational orientation and annual competency programs.á There is evidence that shows that education about pain management does not result in changes with nurses' behavior (Camp-Sorrell and O'Sullivan, 1991).áMany healthcare organizations are trying a different approach in educating their nurses about pain management.áThey are using pain resource nurses with expertise around pain management to help educate other nurses about pain, to improve pain management and patient outcomes. This role uses a combination of communication techniques including educator, change champion, opinion leader, and train-the-trainer approaches.áWhile this role has potential to be a successful implementation strategy, until recently, there have been minimal studies to test the effectiveness of this implementation strategy.áThis presentation will provide a review of the literature that is available, specifically addressing the effectiveness of pain resource nurses as an evidence-based practice implementation strategy.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe State of the Science Around the Pain Resource Nurse Roleen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/153378-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The State of the Science Around the Pain Resource Nurse Role</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Griffin, Emily, RN, MN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Iowa Hospital and Clinics</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Advanced Practice Nurse</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">emily-griffin@uiowa.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Evidence-based Presentation] One very important step of evidence-based practice is facilitating a practice change.&aacute;This is also known as adoption of the practice change.&aacute;We know that the way in which the practice change is communicated, can affect the adoption of that idea.&aacute;We also know that education alone does not increase the adoption rate. Methods that involve more than one implementation strategy, such as use of change champions and opinion leaders, are found to be very effective (Oxman, 1995). Pain management is one example of where the evidence is available (through research and guidelines for best practice), but nurses are still lacking knowledge about best practice around pain.&aacute;Nurses have varying degrees of training around pain in their nursing school courses, and within organizational orientation and annual competency programs.&aacute; There is evidence that shows that education about pain management does not result in changes with nurses' behavior (Camp-Sorrell and O'Sullivan, 1991).&aacute;Many healthcare organizations are trying a different approach in educating their nurses about pain management.&aacute;They are using pain resource nurses with expertise around pain management to help educate other nurses about pain, to improve pain management and patient outcomes. This role uses a combination of communication techniques including educator, change champion, opinion leader, and train-the-trainer approaches.&aacute;While this role has potential to be a successful implementation strategy, until recently, there have been minimal studies to test the effectiveness of this implementation strategy.&aacute;This presentation will provide a review of the literature that is available, specifically addressing the effectiveness of pain resource nurses as an evidence-based practice implementation strategy.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:13:57Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:13:57Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.