Health-Related Quality of Life: Differences Between Children Living With Asthma and Their Caregivers

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/153385
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Health-Related Quality of Life: Differences Between Children Living With Asthma and Their Caregivers
Abstract:
Health-Related Quality of Life: Differences Between Children Living With Asthma and Their Caregivers
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:Harris, Judith A., RN, MS, CPNP
P.I. Institution Name:Phoenix Children's Hospital
Title:Director of Phoenix Breathmobile Project
[Symposium Presentation] Background: Childhood asthma management is a family affair. The health-related quality of life (HRQOL) of children living with asthma and their caregivers are affected.áClinicians treat children with asthma recognize HRQOL in both groups as critical to guiding symptom management. However, little is known about differences between reported HRQOL in children and caregivers and/or the effect of disease severity. Therefore, the aim was to examine between group differences (child and caregiver) in reports of activity limitations (functional health) and emotional function (quality of life) in asthma, and the effect of disease severity. Methods: This sample included 1025 pairs of children (age 7-17) and caregivers who use Breathmobile services. The Pediatric Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire (children) and Pediatric Asthma Caregiver Quality of Life Questionnaire (caregivers) were completed using a 7-point scale (low scores correspond with increased activity limitations and decreased emotional function). Means were compared and the effect of severity analyzed. Results: Means in overall sample showed statistically significant differences on both activity limitation and emotional function between children and caregivers. Caregivers reported less activity limitation (caregivers = 5.49, children = 4.925; p=.000), and decreased emotional function (concern, worry, helplessness, frustration) (caregivers = 4.988, children = 5.239; p=.000). However, when the effect of severity was considered there was no statistical significance. For activity limitation the mean difference between the child with mild versus moderate to severe asthma and their caregivers (.5257; .3004) was not statistically significant (p= .467). For emotional function the mean difference between the child (mild versus moderate to severe asthma) and their caregivers (-.3247; -.4066) was also not statistically significant (p= .554). Conclusion: The successful management of childhood asthma involves a partnership between the child, caregiver and provider.á Because differences exist between the child and caregiver clinicians should consider interventions that are specific to each group.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHealth-Related Quality of Life: Differences Between Children Living With Asthma and Their Caregiversen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/153385-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Health-Related Quality of Life: Differences Between Children Living With Asthma and Their Caregivers</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Harris, Judith A., RN, MS, CPNP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Phoenix Children's Hospital</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Director of Phoenix Breathmobile Project</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jharris@phoenixchildrens.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Symposium Presentation] Background: Childhood asthma management is a family affair. The health-related quality of life (HRQOL) of children living with asthma and their caregivers are affected.&aacute;Clinicians treat children with asthma recognize HRQOL in both groups as critical to guiding symptom management. However, little is known about differences between reported HRQOL in children and caregivers and/or the effect of disease severity. Therefore, the aim was to examine between group differences (child and caregiver) in reports of activity limitations (functional health) and emotional function (quality of life) in asthma, and the effect of disease severity. Methods: This sample included 1025 pairs of children (age 7-17) and caregivers who use Breathmobile services. The Pediatric Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire (children) and Pediatric Asthma Caregiver Quality of Life Questionnaire (caregivers) were completed using a 7-point scale (low scores correspond with increased activity limitations and decreased emotional function). Means were compared and the effect of severity analyzed. Results: Means in overall sample showed statistically significant differences on both activity limitation and emotional function between children and caregivers. Caregivers reported less activity limitation (caregivers = 5.49, children = 4.925; p=.000), and decreased emotional function (concern, worry, helplessness, frustration) (caregivers = 4.988, children = 5.239; p=.000). However, when the effect of severity was considered there was no statistical significance. For activity limitation the mean difference between the child with mild versus moderate to severe asthma and their caregivers (.5257; .3004) was not statistically significant (p= .467). For emotional function the mean difference between the child (mild versus moderate to severe asthma) and their caregivers (-.3247; -.4066) was also not statistically significant (p= .554). Conclusion: The successful management of childhood asthma involves a partnership between the child, caregiver and provider.&aacute; Because differences exist between the child and caregiver clinicians should consider interventions that are specific to each group.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:14:15Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:14:15Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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