Critical incident stress debriefing: does it contribute to mental health in health care professionals?

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/153386
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Critical incident stress debriefing: does it contribute to mental health in health care professionals?
Abstract:
Critical incident stress debriefing: does it contribute to mental health in health care professionals?
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:Hattingh, Susan
P.I. Institution Name:University of South Africa
Title:Associate Professor
[Research Presentation] The personal health of emergency health care professionals working in a trauma and emergency unit is of paramount importance, in particular their psychological safety.áEmergency health care workers who provides care to patients involved in adverse situations are effected themselves by these events. Critical Incident Stress debriefing (CISD) is often regarded as a method to prevent posttraumatic stress in the emergency medical services and therefore a model for the training of peer debriefers was developed, implemented and tested in practice to establish if debriefing after adverse exposure to traumatic incidents contributes to the maintaining of the mental health status of emergency health care professionals. This research will provide evidence to provide answers to the question whether debriefing after experiencing critical incidents does indeed promote psychological help.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCritical incident stress debriefing: does it contribute to mental health in health care professionals?en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/153386-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Critical incident stress debriefing: does it contribute to mental health in health care professionals?</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hattingh, Susan</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of South Africa</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">hattisp@unisa.ac.za</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Research Presentation] The personal health of emergency health care professionals working in a trauma and emergency unit is of paramount importance, in particular their psychological safety.&aacute;Emergency health care workers who provides care to patients involved in adverse situations are effected themselves by these events. Critical Incident Stress debriefing (CISD) is often regarded as a method to prevent posttraumatic stress in the emergency medical services and therefore a model for the training of peer debriefers was developed, implemented and tested in practice to establish if debriefing after adverse exposure to traumatic incidents contributes to the maintaining of the mental health status of emergency health care professionals. This research will provide evidence to provide answers to the question whether debriefing after experiencing critical incidents does indeed promote psychological help.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:14:17Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:14:17Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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