2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/153410
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Wise Women against Diabetes
Abstract:
Wise Women against Diabetes
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Williams, Tammy Lynn, RN, MSN, MBA
P.I. Institution Name:University of South Carolina
An estimated 18.2 million people in the U.S. have diabetes and of those, 90-95% have Type 2 diabetes. Meeting the recommended levels of physical activity is beneficial for diabetes management. Nearly one-third of Type 2 diabetics report no involvement in regular physical activity, while 38% report insufficient levels of physical activity. Vigorous physical activity is difficult for sedentary women with Type 2 diabetes. These women become frustrated and may relapse to sedentary lifestyles. Walking is ideal for this population. Walking is the most common mode of physical activity for diabetic patients, and has been shown to improve insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force urges healthcare providers to use counseling techniques to promote physical activity among patients. Although physical activity counseling is commonly given to patients with chronic illnesses, the majority of patients who receive counseling are men. Purpose: This study will test the effect of a Walking Intervention and Supportive Environment (WISE) protocol designed to increase the amount of walking and frequency of self-monitoring blood glucose in Type 2 diabetic women. WISE is guided by the Health Promotion Model and the Transtheoretical Model of Change. Method: A quasi-experimental design will be used in a sample (N=80) of women with Type 2 diabetes. WISE counseling will be provided to the intervention group and consists of weekly telephone counseling and monthly mailings designed to increase walking and frequency of blood glucose monitoring. Data Analysis: ANOVA will be used to determine differences between control and intervention group on: walking, frequency of self-monitoring blood glucose, HbA1c levels, and body mass index. Findings: Preliminary findings will be presented. Implications: The knowledge from this study will assist in further development of effective interventions aimed at increasing physical activity levels and the frequency of self-monitoring blood glucose in Type 2 diabetic women.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWise Women against Diabetesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/153410-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Wise Women against Diabetes</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Williams, Tammy Lynn, RN, MSN, MBA</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of South Carolina</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">TLWWL@aol.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">An estimated 18.2 million people in the U.S. have diabetes and of those, 90-95% have Type 2 diabetes. Meeting the recommended levels of physical activity is beneficial for diabetes management. Nearly one-third of Type 2 diabetics report no involvement in regular physical activity, while 38% report insufficient levels of physical activity. Vigorous physical activity is difficult for sedentary women with Type 2 diabetes. These women become frustrated and may relapse to sedentary lifestyles. Walking is ideal for this population. Walking is the most common mode of physical activity for diabetic patients, and has been shown to improve insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force urges healthcare providers to use counseling techniques to promote physical activity among patients. Although physical activity counseling is commonly given to patients with chronic illnesses, the majority of patients who receive counseling are men. Purpose: This study will test the effect of a Walking Intervention and Supportive Environment (WISE) protocol designed to increase the amount of walking and frequency of self-monitoring blood glucose in Type 2 diabetic women. WISE is guided by the Health Promotion Model and the Transtheoretical Model of Change. Method: A quasi-experimental design will be used in a sample (N=80) of women with Type 2 diabetes. WISE counseling will be provided to the intervention group and consists of weekly telephone counseling and monthly mailings designed to increase walking and frequency of blood glucose monitoring. Data Analysis: ANOVA will be used to determine differences between control and intervention group on: walking, frequency of self-monitoring blood glucose, HbA1c levels, and body mass index. Findings: Preliminary findings will be presented. Implications: The knowledge from this study will assist in further development of effective interventions aimed at increasing physical activity levels and the frequency of self-monitoring blood glucose in Type 2 diabetic women.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:15:16Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:15:16Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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