2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/153414
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Kangaroo Holding to Improve Breastfeeding Success
Abstract:
Kangaroo Holding to Improve Breastfeeding Success
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Johnson, Amy Nagorski, RNC, DNSc
P.I. Institution Name:University of Delaware
Title:Assistant Professor of Nursing
Skin-to-skin holding of infants clad only in diapers against their mothers' chest for more than an hour at a time is thought to promote the mother's ability to produce breast milk, but has not been empirically tested. This study describes the effect of skin-to-skin holding on maternal breast milk volume and then relates the finding to the evidence on early kangaroo holding premature infants. Hypothesis: There is a significant difference in the volume of maternal breast milk pumped after skin-to-skin holding premature infants as compared to maternal breast milk pumped after non-holding conditions. Design and Sample: This is a repeated measures crossover design of 36 breastfeeding mothers. Procedure: Each mother enrolled skin-to-skin held her infant for an hour (holding condition) and then, within 30 minutes of holding, expressed their breast milk. Each mother completed two skin-to-skin holding experiences in the 4-day study enrollment. All breast milk was measured in grams and compared to milk volumes expressed in non-holding conditions. Findings: In every instance, mothers pumped significantly more breast milk after skin-to-skin holding their infant. In addition, increases in milk volumes persisted throughout the study enrollment. Significance: Implementation of skin-to-skin holding as a nursing intervention can improve breast milk production for mothers in the SCN. Research evidence suggests that this intervention has additional infant growth and development benefits.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleKangaroo Holding to Improve Breastfeeding Successen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/153414-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Kangaroo Holding to Improve Breastfeeding Success</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Johnson, Amy Nagorski, RNC, DNSc</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Delaware</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Ajohnson@udel.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Skin-to-skin holding of infants clad only in diapers against their mothers' chest for more than an hour at a time is thought to promote the mother's ability to produce breast milk, but has not been empirically tested. This study describes the effect of skin-to-skin holding on maternal breast milk volume and then relates the finding to the evidence on early kangaroo holding premature infants. Hypothesis: There is a significant difference in the volume of maternal breast milk pumped after skin-to-skin holding premature infants as compared to maternal breast milk pumped after non-holding conditions. Design and Sample: This is a repeated measures crossover design of 36 breastfeeding mothers. Procedure: Each mother enrolled skin-to-skin held her infant for an hour (holding condition) and then, within 30 minutes of holding, expressed their breast milk. Each mother completed two skin-to-skin holding experiences in the 4-day study enrollment. All breast milk was measured in grams and compared to milk volumes expressed in non-holding conditions. Findings: In every instance, mothers pumped significantly more breast milk after skin-to-skin holding their infant. In addition, increases in milk volumes persisted throughout the study enrollment. Significance: Implementation of skin-to-skin holding as a nursing intervention can improve breast milk production for mothers in the SCN. Research evidence suggests that this intervention has additional infant growth and development benefits.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:15:26Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:15:26Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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