Noise Levels Experienced by Infants Receiving Hood Oxygen Therapy and Nebulization Treatments

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/153422
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Noise Levels Experienced by Infants Receiving Hood Oxygen Therapy and Nebulization Treatments
Abstract:
Noise Levels Experienced by Infants Receiving Hood Oxygen Therapy and Nebulization Treatments
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Witt, Patti Kay, MA, CNP, RN
P.I. Institution Name:The College of St. Catherine
Title:Assistant Professor of Nursing
Noise levels experienced by infants receiving hood oxygen therapy and nebulization treatments was investigated to develop information to be used by nurse practitioners to decrease the infant's risk of cochlear damage from excessive noise levels contributing to permanent sensorineural hearing impairment. A quantitative research approach was used to identify the noise levels of hood oxygen therapy and nebulization in different hoods at various flow rates. Four different hoods and five flow rates were investigated in a non-patient care area without infants present. Quantitative data were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics. The high sound levels of hood oxygen therapy and nebulization obtained in this study demonstrate that both treatments can produce noise loud enough to cause cochlea damage. The findings in this study also indicate that: (a) there are statistically significant differences in the noise levels experienced by infants receiving hood oxygen therapy in different sizes and types of hoods, (b) adding nebulization to oxygen therapy was not statistically significant in changing sound levels, and (c) there are statistically significant differences in sound levels at different flow rates during nebulization. Advances in obstetrical and neonatal care continue to improve survival for fragile infants while the morbidity related to developmental disabilities, including hearing impairment remains. The findings of this study support the need for further research in noise abatement techniques and treatments.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNoise Levels Experienced by Infants Receiving Hood Oxygen Therapy and Nebulization Treatmentsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/153422-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Noise Levels Experienced by Infants Receiving Hood Oxygen Therapy and Nebulization Treatments</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Witt, Patti Kay, MA, CNP, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">The College of St. Catherine</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">pkwitt@stkate.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Noise levels experienced by infants receiving hood oxygen therapy and nebulization treatments was investigated to develop information to be used by nurse practitioners to decrease the infant's risk of cochlear damage from excessive noise levels contributing to permanent sensorineural hearing impairment. A quantitative research approach was used to identify the noise levels of hood oxygen therapy and nebulization in different hoods at various flow rates. Four different hoods and five flow rates were investigated in a non-patient care area without infants present. Quantitative data were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics. The high sound levels of hood oxygen therapy and nebulization obtained in this study demonstrate that both treatments can produce noise loud enough to cause cochlea damage. The findings in this study also indicate that: (a) there are statistically significant differences in the noise levels experienced by infants receiving hood oxygen therapy in different sizes and types of hoods, (b) adding nebulization to oxygen therapy was not statistically significant in changing sound levels, and (c) there are statistically significant differences in sound levels at different flow rates during nebulization. Advances in obstetrical and neonatal care continue to improve survival for fragile infants while the morbidity related to developmental disabilities, including hearing impairment remains. The findings of this study support the need for further research in noise abatement techniques and treatments.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:15:45Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:15:45Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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