Psychiatric and Social Determinants of CVD Risk in African Americans With Type 2 Diabetes

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/153433
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Psychiatric and Social Determinants of CVD Risk in African Americans With Type 2 Diabetes
Abstract:
Psychiatric and Social Determinants of CVD Risk in African Americans With Type 2 Diabetes
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Collins-McNeil, Janice, APRN, BC
P.I. Institution Name:University of Tennessee Health Science Center
Co-Authors:Judy Carbage Martin, PhD, APRN, BC
Despite the high prevalence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in middle age and older African American adults with type 2 diabetes (T2D), limited research has explored associations among anxiety symptoms, depressive symptoms, perceived social support and CVD risk in these persons. The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of anxiety and depressive characteristics, and perceived social support on CVD risk characteristics of African American middle to older adults with T2D. Using face-to-face interviews conducted by the primary investigator and trained research assistants, this cross-sectional, descriptive-correlational study examined a convenience sample of 57 women (n=45) and men (n=12) aged from 35 to 73 years (M = 54.96 ¦ 11.44 years) and enrolled in three community-based primary care centers in the southeastern US. Five instruments were used to assess study variables: 1) State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (state and trait anxiety); 2) Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (depressive symptoms); 3) Medical Outcomes Survey Social Support Questionnaire (perceived social support); 4) National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Framingham Coronary Heart Disease Risk Prediction Score (CVD risk); and 5) Personal, Health and Sociodemographic Questionnaire (sociodemographic and health information). Findings indicated the absence of associations between CVD risk and other study variables. Relationships were, however, noted among depressive symptoms, anxiety symptoms, and perceived social support, suggesting that individuals with low prevalence of depressive symptoms tended to have low levels of anxiety and high levels of perceived social support. Multiple linear regression analyses yielded a 10% variance that was not statistically significant, suggesting that other variables are better determinants of CVD risk than the predictor variables. Alarmingly CVD risk profiles indicated greater than a 20% probability of experiencing a CVD event within 2 to 10 years. Findings warrant aggressive follow-up and intervention to improve health outcomes of middle to older adult African Americans with T2D.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePsychiatric and Social Determinants of CVD Risk in African Americans With Type 2 Diabetesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/153433-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Psychiatric and Social Determinants of CVD Risk in African Americans With Type 2 Diabetes</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Collins-McNeil, Janice, APRN, BC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Tennessee Health Science Center</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jmcneilrn@aol.com</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Judy Carbage Martin, PhD, APRN, BC</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Despite the high prevalence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in middle age and older African American adults with type 2 diabetes (T2D), limited research has explored associations among anxiety symptoms, depressive symptoms, perceived social support and CVD risk in these persons. The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of anxiety and depressive characteristics, and perceived social support on CVD risk characteristics of African American middle to older adults with T2D. Using face-to-face interviews conducted by the primary investigator and trained research assistants, this cross-sectional, descriptive-correlational study examined a convenience sample of 57 women (n=45) and men (n=12) aged from 35 to 73 years (M = 54.96 &brvbar; 11.44 years) and enrolled in three community-based primary care centers in the southeastern US. Five instruments were used to assess study variables: 1) State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (state and trait anxiety); 2) Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (depressive symptoms); 3) Medical Outcomes Survey Social Support Questionnaire (perceived social support); 4) National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Framingham Coronary Heart Disease Risk Prediction Score (CVD risk); and 5) Personal, Health and Sociodemographic Questionnaire (sociodemographic and health information). Findings indicated the absence of associations between CVD risk and other study variables. Relationships were, however, noted among depressive symptoms, anxiety symptoms, and perceived social support, suggesting that individuals with low prevalence of depressive symptoms tended to have low levels of anxiety and high levels of perceived social support. Multiple linear regression analyses yielded a 10% variance that was not statistically significant, suggesting that other variables are better determinants of CVD risk than the predictor variables. Alarmingly CVD risk profiles indicated greater than a 20% probability of experiencing a CVD event within 2 to 10 years. Findings warrant aggressive follow-up and intervention to improve health outcomes of middle to older adult African Americans with T2D.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:16:12Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:16:12Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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