Antecedents and Consequences of Perceived Organizational Support: The Nurse Manager Experience in Acute Care Settings

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/153439
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Antecedents and Consequences of Perceived Organizational Support: The Nurse Manager Experience in Acute Care Settings
Abstract:
Antecedents and Consequences of Perceived Organizational Support: The Nurse Manager Experience in Acute Care Settings
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2006
Author:Almost, Joan M., RN, MScN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Toronto
Title:Doctoral Student
Co-Authors:Heather K. S. Laschinger, RN, PhD; Nancy Purdy, RN, MScN; Julia Cho, RN, MScN
The span of control and areas of responsibility for nurse managers has expanded significantly over the last decade.  There has been a 29% reduction in manager roles across Canada since 1994.  As a result, fewer nurses are interested in pursuing management positions due to a perceived lack of support, unrealistic job expectations and lack of rewards.  Many managers will retire in the next few years.  There is a tremendous need to attract new managers while creating structures to maintain the current complement of experienced managers.  Eisenberger?s (1986) Theory of Perceived Organizational Support (POS) maintains that a fundamental condition of employee satisfaction and commitment is the valuing of employees? contributions and well-being by the organization.  Management behaviours and organizational policies form the basis for employees? interpretation of organizational support.  A study was conducted to test a theoretical model of the antecedents and consequences of managers? perceived organizational support derived from Eisenberger?s theory.  A descriptive, correlational design was used in a random sample of 202 hospital-based first-line nurse managers in Ontario.  The strongest antecedents of managers? POS were respect, recognition, and immediate supervisor support.  Consequences of manager POS included high levels of organizational commitment, job satisfaction, and low levels of burnout.  The results suggest that when managers feel respected by their superiors and recognized for their contribution to organizational goals, they are more likely to feel valued by the organization, which, in turn, results in positive outcomes for both managers and organizations. The results suggest strategies for creating positive work conditions that promote retention of nurse managers.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAntecedents and Consequences of Perceived Organizational Support: The Nurse Manager Experience in Acute Care Settingsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/153439-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Antecedents and Consequences of Perceived Organizational Support: The Nurse Manager Experience in Acute Care Settings</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Almost, Joan M., RN, MScN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Toronto</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Doctoral Student</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jmalmost@uwo.ca</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Heather K. S. Laschinger, RN, PhD; Nancy Purdy, RN, MScN; Julia Cho, RN, MScN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The span of control and areas of responsibility for nurse managers has expanded significantly over the last decade.&nbsp; There has been a 29% reduction in manager roles across Canada since 1994.&nbsp; As a result, fewer nurses are interested in pursuing management positions due to a perceived lack of support, unrealistic job expectations and lack of rewards.&nbsp; Many managers will retire in the next few years.&nbsp; There is a tremendous need to attract new managers while creating structures to maintain the current complement of experienced managers.&nbsp; Eisenberger?s (1986) Theory of Perceived Organizational Support (POS) maintains that a fundamental condition of employee satisfaction and commitment is the valuing of employees? contributions and well-being by the organization.&nbsp; Management behaviours and organizational policies form the basis for employees? interpretation of organizational support.&nbsp; A study was conducted to test a theoretical model of the antecedents and consequences of managers? perceived organizational support derived from Eisenberger?s theory.&nbsp; A descriptive, correlational design was used in a random sample of 202 hospital-based first-line nurse managers in Ontario.&nbsp; The strongest antecedents of managers? POS were respect, recognition, and immediate supervisor support.&nbsp; Consequences of manager POS included high levels of organizational commitment, job satisfaction, and low levels of burnout.&nbsp; The results suggest that when managers feel respected by their superiors and recognized for their contribution to organizational goals, they are more likely to feel valued by the organization, which, in turn, results in positive outcomes for both managers and organizations. The results suggest strategies for creating positive work conditions that promote retention of nurse managers.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:16:27Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:16:27Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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