2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/153445
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Open Hospital Visitation
Abstract:
Open Hospital Visitation
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2006
Author:Belgard, Debra, RN, BSN, CNOR
P.I. Institution Name:The Methodist Hospital
Title:Staff Nurse
Much of the restriction in visitation has been in hospital areas such as critical care units, the Emergency Department (ED) and the Post Anesthesia Care Units (PACU). In the 1960s, the first critical care units were created. The United States Department of Health recommended that visitation be restricted to immediate family members for short periods of time. The belief was that visitation could have negative effects on patients, by affecting blood pressure, heart rate, and increasing intracranial pressure. Children were also excluded from visitation because of the fear that infections would be transmitted to patients. Through research, evidence is now available suggesting that less restricted visitation may be desired and actually beneficial. Family members have expressed the need to be physically with the patient in order to provide emotional support. Studies have shown that less restrictive visitation has demonstrated higher patient and family satisfaction and reports of fewer formal complaints from families. Research shows that nurses frequently base visitation practices on the patient needs, regardless of their institutional or unit policies. Literature supports less restrictive visitation to enhance patient and family satisfaction and most health care team members like open visitation. Less restrictive visitation policies have been implemented in the ED, critical care units, PACU, and acute care units. There are five critical care units that have all adopted visitation hours depending on the patient population, such as a medical versus surgical patients, and patient and family needs. Children of any age are allowed to visit as long as they are not currently ill.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleOpen Hospital Visitationen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/153445-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Open Hospital Visitation</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Belgard, Debra, RN, BSN, CNOR</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">The Methodist Hospital</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Staff Nurse</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">dbelgard@tmh.tmc.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Much of the restriction in visitation has been in hospital areas such as critical care units, the Emergency Department (ED) and the Post Anesthesia Care Units (PACU). In the 1960s, the first critical care units were created. The United States Department of Health recommended that visitation be restricted to immediate family members for short periods of time. The belief was that visitation could have negative effects on patients, by affecting blood pressure, heart rate, and increasing intracranial pressure. Children were also excluded from visitation because of the fear that infections would be transmitted to patients. Through research, evidence is now available suggesting that less restricted visitation may be desired and actually beneficial. Family members have expressed the need to be physically with the patient in order to provide emotional support. Studies have shown that less restrictive visitation has demonstrated higher patient and family satisfaction and reports of fewer formal complaints from families. Research shows that nurses frequently base visitation practices on the patient needs, regardless of their institutional or unit policies. Literature supports less restrictive visitation to enhance patient and family satisfaction and most health care team members like open visitation. Less restrictive visitation policies have been implemented in the ED, critical care units, PACU, and acute care units. There are five critical care units that have all adopted visitation hours depending on the patient population, such as a medical versus surgical patients, and patient and family needs. Children of any age are allowed to visit as long as they are not currently ill.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:16:42Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:16:42Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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