2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/153449
Type:
Presentation
Title:
An Analysis of Critical Thinking Abilities in Competent and Expert Nurses
Abstract:
An Analysis of Critical Thinking Abilities in Competent and Expert Nurses
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2006
Author:Bobay, Kathleen, PhD, APRN, BC
P.I. Institution Name:Marquette University
Title:Assistant Professor
We often hear that expert nurses must have better critical thinking skills than competent nurses.  However, the nursing literature has not supported this relationship consistently.  One difficulty may lie in the critical thinking tools which are most frequently used in nursing education research.  Additionally, there are few reliable methods for determining nursing expertise.  Consequently, nurse researchers often rely on years of nursing experience as the measure. This study explored whether there are measurable differences between competent and expert clinical nurses who completed four commonly used critical thinking tools:  the California Critical Thinking Skills Test, the California Critical Thinking Dispositions Inventory, the Cornell Critical Thinking Test ? version Z, and the Watson-Glaser Critical Thinking Appraisal.  Nurses were recruited from a large Midwestern US healthcare system which has a long-standing professional practice model (12 years) based on Benner?s (1984) novice-to-expert continuum. No statistically significant differences were found when comparing competent and expert nurses using any of the four critical thinking tools.  There were also no statistically significant differences between any of the tools and education level.  Expert nurses did have significantly more years of experience than competent nurses and were more likely to be nationally certified. Consideration for how critical thinking tools are used to measure nursing education program outcomes is necessary.  More sensitive measures are needed to quantify differences among levels of clinical nursing expertise.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAn Analysis of Critical Thinking Abilities in Competent and Expert Nursesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/153449-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">An Analysis of Critical Thinking Abilities in Competent and Expert Nurses</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Bobay, Kathleen, PhD, APRN, BC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Marquette University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">kathleen.bobay@marquette.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">We often hear that expert nurses must have better critical thinking skills than competent nurses.&nbsp; However, the nursing literature has not supported this relationship consistently.&nbsp; One difficulty may lie in the critical thinking tools which are most frequently used in nursing education research.&nbsp; Additionally, there are few reliable methods for determining nursing expertise.&nbsp; Consequently, nurse researchers often rely on years of nursing experience as the measure. This study explored whether there are measurable differences between competent and expert clinical nurses who completed four commonly used critical thinking tools:&nbsp; the California Critical Thinking Skills Test, the California Critical Thinking Dispositions Inventory, the Cornell Critical Thinking Test ? version Z, and the Watson-Glaser Critical Thinking Appraisal.&nbsp; Nurses were recruited from a large Midwestern US healthcare system which has a long-standing professional practice model (12 years) based on Benner?s (1984) novice-to-expert continuum. No statistically significant differences were found when comparing competent and expert nurses using any of the four critical thinking tools.&nbsp; There were also no statistically significant differences between any of the tools and education level.&nbsp; Expert nurses did have significantly more years of experience than competent nurses and were more likely to be nationally certified.&nbsp;Consideration for how critical thinking tools are used to measure nursing education program outcomes is necessary.&nbsp; More sensitive measures are needed to quantify differences among levels of clinical nursing expertise.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:16:52Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:16:52Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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