2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/153462
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Risk Factors of Increased Weight Gain in Chinese Children
Abstract:
Risk Factors of Increased Weight Gain in Chinese Children
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2006
Author:Chen, Jyu-Lin, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of California, San Francisco
Title:Assistant Professor
Co-Authors:Christine Kennedy, PhD, PNP
Background:  Childhood obesity is a global health epidemic and is increasing in many industrialized and developing countries, including Taiwan. Little is known, however, about the factors that determine relative weight gain in Chinese children. Understanding the risk factors for Chinese children is crucial because of a significant increase in the prevalence of overweight, from 17.6 % in 1988 to 22% in 1996 in Taiwan  Methods:  A longitudinal study design was used to examine factors associated with change of body mass index (BMI) over one year in Chinese children,. A total of 307 children completed both baseline and one-year follow-up measures. Standardized and culturally appropriate instruments were used to measure the children?s food intake, physical activity/inactivity, health-related physical fitness, and maternal BMI. Results:  Pearson correlation coefficient analyses suggested that a high baseline BMI (r=.86,p .<.01), poor aerobic capacity (r=-.24, p=.01), and a high maternal BMI (r=.26, p=.01) were significantly correlated with increased BMI at 12 months follow-up. Stepwise regression indicated that a high BMI at the baseline, mother?s overweight status, increased TV viewing and computer time, and poorer aerobic capacity were identified as risk factors of increased weight in children (F = 207.67, p < .001, adjusted R2 = .752). Conclusions:  Understanding the risk factors for increased BMI in childhood is critical in preventing the onset of obesity and its persistence into adulthood, its resistance to treatment, and its detrimental health consequences. Chinese children, who historically have not been viewed as an at risk population for obesity, should not be ignored. Healthcare providers can undertake the critical task of raising awareness of childhood obesity by including the family in their children?s healthcare visits and incorporating assessments of maternal weight status, children?s BMI over time, children?s television viewing and computer time, and their aerobic capacity into patient care and education.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRisk Factors of Increased Weight Gain in Chinese Childrenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/153462-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Risk Factors of Increased Weight Gain in Chinese Children</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Chen, Jyu-Lin, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of California, San Francisco</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jyu-lin.chen@nursing.ucsf.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Christine Kennedy, PhD, PNP</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background:&nbsp; Childhood obesity is a global health epidemic and is increasing in many industrialized and developing countries, including Taiwan. Little is known, however, about the factors that determine relative weight gain in Chinese children. Understanding the risk factors for Chinese children is crucial because of a significant increase in the prevalence of overweight, from 17.6 % in 1988 to 22% in 1996 in Taiwan &nbsp;Methods: &nbsp;A longitudinal study design was used to examine factors associated with change of body mass index (BMI) over one year in Chinese children,. A total of 307 children completed both baseline and one-year follow-up measures. Standardized and culturally appropriate instruments were used to measure the children?s food intake, physical activity/inactivity, health-related physical fitness, and maternal BMI. Results:&nbsp; Pearson correlation coefficient analyses suggested that a high baseline BMI (r=.86,p .&lt;.01), poor&nbsp;aerobic capacity (r=-.24, p=.01), and a high maternal BMI (r=.26, p=.01) were significantly correlated with increased BMI at 12 months follow-up. Stepwise regression indicated that a high BMI at the baseline, mother?s overweight status, increased TV viewing and computer time, and poorer aerobic capacity were identified as risk factors of increased weight in children (F = 207.67, p &lt; .001, adjusted R2 = .752). Conclusions: &nbsp;Understanding the risk factors for increased BMI in childhood is critical in preventing the onset of obesity and its persistence into adulthood, its resistance to treatment, and its detrimental health consequences. Chinese children, who historically have not been viewed as an at risk population for obesity, should not be ignored. Healthcare providers can undertake the critical task of raising awareness of childhood obesity by including the family in their children?s healthcare visits and incorporating assessments of maternal weight status, children?s BMI over time, children?s television viewing and computer time, and their aerobic capacity into patient care and education.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:17:24Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:17:24Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.