Magic T.V.: Nurse-Facilitated Use of Light-Assisted Minimally Guided Imagery in the Pediatric Emergency Department

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/153463
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Magic T.V.: Nurse-Facilitated Use of Light-Assisted Minimally Guided Imagery in the Pediatric Emergency Department
Abstract:
Magic T.V.: Nurse-Facilitated Use of Light-Assisted Minimally Guided Imagery in the Pediatric Emergency Department
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2006
Author:Civilette Downs, Frances, RN, MSN
P.I. Institution Name:Barry University
Title:Doctoral Student
School age patients presenting to the emergency department with lacerations and conditions requiring minor procedures experience fear, pain and heightened levels of anxiety. Acute pain and anxiety management during procedures can be a challenge for staff as well as the patient?s family member.   Inadequate pain control and associated anxiety may lead to adverse clinical and developmental outcomes in young children. The term ?imagery? defined by Menzies and Gill, as a ?mental function, a lived experience that is a dynamic, quasi-real, psycho-physiological process? (Menzies & Gill  2004). Nurse?s incorporation of the complementary therapy of ?Magic TV? or light assisted minimally guided imagery may decrease the need for pharmacologic or physical restraint interventions, and promote resiliency for pediatric patients presenting to the emergency department with heightened anxiety and pain. Utilizing the theoretical framework of environmental interaction described in Enabling America (Brandt & Pope eds. 1997), employment of ?Magic TV? provides the school age child a means of re-gaining control within a temporarily restricted environment.  Nursing staff and family members are easily trained in the process of light assisted minimally guided imagery. The technique requires a lamp equipped with an ordinary 40 to 60 watt incandescent light bulb held at least 24 inches from the patient?s closed eyes during the minor procedure.  The child is instructed to close their eyes, and tell the staff and present family member which favorite image ?see? on the ?Magic TV ?. Visualization provides a distraction away from anxiety provoking stimuli and affords the child a means of self-selecting a comforting focus.   The light source may stimulate visual receptors, aiding the child in creative visualization.  Light also plays a role in mediating neurotransmitters dopamine and serotonin. Pain assessment scales are collected pre and post procedure, and compared to a control group receiving standard care.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMagic T.V.: Nurse-Facilitated Use of Light-Assisted Minimally Guided Imagery in the Pediatric Emergency Departmenten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/153463-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Magic T.V.: Nurse-Facilitated Use of Light-Assisted Minimally Guided Imagery in the Pediatric Emergency Department</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Civilette Downs, Frances, RN, MSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Barry University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Doctoral Student</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">frandowns1@yahoo.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">School age patients presenting to the emergency department with lacerations and conditions requiring minor procedures experience fear, pain and heightened levels of anxiety.&nbsp;Acute pain and anxiety management during procedures can be a challenge for staff as well as the patient?s family member. &nbsp;&nbsp;Inadequate pain control and associated anxiety may lead to adverse clinical and developmental outcomes in young children. The term ?imagery? defined by Menzies and Gill, as a ?mental function, a lived experience that is a dynamic, quasi-real, psycho-physiological process? (Menzies &amp; Gill&nbsp; 2004).&nbsp;Nurse?s incorporation of the complementary therapy of ?Magic TV? or light assisted minimally guided imagery may decrease the need for pharmacologic or physical restraint interventions, and promote resiliency for pediatric patients presenting to the emergency department with heightened anxiety and pain.&nbsp;Utilizing the theoretical framework of environmental interaction described in Enabling America (Brandt &amp; Pope eds. 1997), employment of ?Magic TV? provides the school age child a means of re-gaining control within a temporarily restricted environment.&nbsp; Nursing staff and family members are easily trained in the process of light assisted minimally guided imagery.&nbsp;The technique requires a lamp equipped with an ordinary 40 to 60 watt incandescent light bulb held at least 24 inches from the patient?s closed eyes during the minor procedure.&nbsp; The child is instructed to close their eyes, and tell the staff and present family member which favorite image ?see? on the ?Magic TV ?. Visualization provides a distraction away from anxiety provoking stimuli and affords the child a means of self-selecting a comforting focus.&nbsp;&nbsp; The light source may stimulate visual receptors, aiding the child in creative visualization.&nbsp; Light also plays a role in mediating neurotransmitters dopamine and serotonin.&nbsp;Pain assessment scales are collected pre and post procedure, and compared to a control group receiving standard care.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:17:26Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:17:26Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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