Emergency Department Interventions for Patients Admitted to a Critical Care Unit from an Emergency Department on Outcomes of Hospital Mortality and Length of Stay

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/153464
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Emergency Department Interventions for Patients Admitted to a Critical Care Unit from an Emergency Department on Outcomes of Hospital Mortality and Length of Stay
Abstract:
Emergency Department Interventions for Patients Admitted to a Critical Care Unit from an Emergency Department on Outcomes of Hospital Mortality and Length of Stay
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2006
Author:Clark, Karen M., PhD, MSN, CCRN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Maryland School of Nursing
Title:Assistant Professor Program Director
Emergency department visits are on the increase. Difficulties in moving patients out of the ED and into in-patient beds exist. Critically ill patients, requiring critical care interventions, often are managed in the ED while waiting for long periods of time for available beds. Little is known of the outcomes after hospitalized for this acutely ill population. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of wait times, such as from admission order for an ICU bed to transfer from the ED to the ICU bed, on outcomes of hospital mortality and length of stay. The study design was a non-experimental, exploratory, retrospective, comparative analysis on a secondary data set. The final sample size was 1,536. Exploratory analysis employing logistic and linear regression was used with descriptive analysis and correlations using SPSS 11.5. Findings: it was more likely the longer the wait in the ED after an admission order, the higher mortality for the hospitalization; time to first medication, once in the ED, the more likely the increase in the hospital length of stay; and time to first medication effected the wait time from receiving the ICU admission order to leaving the ED. These findings may be reflective of overall hospital system issues as opposed to individual hospital or department process. Investigating processes of ED interventions and the impact on outcomes may provide the information to revise practice. Measuring timeliness of nursing interventions, collaborative physician/nurse interactions, could provide necessary statistical data to promote the value of nursing interventions. Collecting substantiated data driven by valid and reliable outcomes would support policy changes to increase the available resources in our healthcare system, with subsequent impact on access and quality outcomes. .
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEmergency Department Interventions for Patients Admitted to a Critical Care Unit from an Emergency Department on Outcomes of Hospital Mortality and Length of Stayen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/153464-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Emergency Department Interventions for Patients Admitted to a Critical Care Unit from an Emergency Department on Outcomes of Hospital Mortality and Length of Stay</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Clark, Karen M., PhD, MSN, CCRN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Maryland School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor Program Director</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">kclar006@son.umaryland.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Emergency department visits are on the increase. Difficulties in moving patients out of the ED and into in-patient beds exist. Critically ill patients, requiring critical care interventions, often are managed in the ED while waiting for long periods of time for available beds. Little is known of the outcomes after hospitalized for this acutely ill population. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of wait times, such as from admission order for an ICU bed to transfer from the ED to the ICU bed, on outcomes of hospital mortality and length of stay. The study design was a non-experimental, exploratory, retrospective, comparative analysis on a secondary data set. The final sample size was 1,536. Exploratory analysis employing logistic and linear regression was used with descriptive analysis and correlations using SPSS 11.5. Findings: it was more likely the longer the wait in the ED after an admission order, the higher mortality for the hospitalization; time to first medication, once in the ED, the more likely the increase in the hospital length of stay; and time to first medication effected the wait time from receiving the ICU admission order to leaving the ED. These findings may be reflective of overall hospital system issues as opposed to individual hospital or department process. Investigating processes of ED interventions and the impact on outcomes may provide the information to revise practice. Measuring timeliness of nursing interventions, collaborative physician/nurse interactions, could provide necessary statistical data to promote the value of nursing interventions. Collecting substantiated data driven by valid and reliable outcomes would support policy changes to increase the available resources in our healthcare system, with subsequent impact on access and quality outcomes. .</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:17:28Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:17:28Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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