Intimate Partner Violence and Mental Health Outcomes Among U.S. Born, Immigrant, and Migrant Latinas

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/153468
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Intimate Partner Violence and Mental Health Outcomes Among U.S. Born, Immigrant, and Migrant Latinas
Abstract:
Intimate Partner Violence and Mental Health Outcomes Among U.S. Born, Immigrant, and Migrant Latinas
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2006
Author:Connelly, Cynthia D., PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Child and Adolescent Services Research Center (CASRC), San Diego, CA; University of San Diego Hahn School of Nursing
Title:Research Scientist, Associate Professor
Co-Authors:Andrea L. Hazen, PhD
The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between intimate partner violence (IPV) and related mental health outcomes among Latina women. Data were derived from Latinas who were receiving health care services from a large primary care health organization in Southern California. Women were interviewed about demographic characteristics, substance use, mental health issues, and IPV. Participants included 117 immigrants, 126 US born, and 49 migrant Latinas. Among the 292 respondents, significantly more US born (21.4%) and migrants (18.4%), in contrast to immigrants (5.1%), reported any sexual abuse in the previous 12 months.  The reports of physical and psychological violence for the past year were high but not significant between groups. Partner substance use was associated with past year physical and psychological IPV. Marital status- divorced/separated was associated with physical, sexual, and psychological IPV. Relative to immigrant women, those who were U.S. born were at increased risk of sexual and psychological victimization and migrant women were at increased risk for sexual victimization when demographic factors were controlled. Regression analyses were used to examine the associations of IPV with potential mental health outcomes. Physical violence was associated with symptoms of depression and hostility and psychological abuse was related to depression, hostility, and somatization.  Sexual violence was negatively associated with phobic anxiety.  Intimate partner violence experiences were not related to participants? self-esteem.  Implications for policy, practice, and early prevention/intervention strategies will be discussed.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleIntimate Partner Violence and Mental Health Outcomes Among U.S. Born, Immigrant, and Migrant Latinasen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/153468-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Intimate Partner Violence and Mental Health Outcomes Among U.S. Born, Immigrant, and Migrant Latinas</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Connelly, Cynthia D., PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Child and Adolescent Services Research Center (CASRC), San Diego, CA; University of San Diego Hahn School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Research Scientist, Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">cconnelly@casrc.org</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Andrea L. Hazen, PhD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between intimate partner violence (IPV) and related mental health outcomes among Latina women. Data were derived from Latinas who were receiving health care services from a large primary care health organization in Southern California. Women were interviewed about demographic characteristics, substance use, mental health issues, and IPV. Participants included 117 immigrants, 126 US born, and 49 migrant Latinas. Among the 292 respondents, significantly more US born (21.4%) and migrants (18.4%), in contrast to immigrants (5.1%), reported any sexual abuse in the previous 12 months. &nbsp;The reports of physical and psychological violence for the past year were high but not significant between groups. Partner substance use was associated with past year physical and psychological IPV. Marital status- divorced/separated was associated with physical, sexual, and psychological IPV. Relative to immigrant women, those who were U.S. born were at increased risk of sexual and psychological victimization and migrant women were at increased risk for sexual victimization when demographic factors were controlled. Regression analyses were used to examine the associations of IPV with potential mental health outcomes. Physical violence was associated with symptoms of depression and hostility and psychological abuse was related to depression, hostility, and somatization.&nbsp; Sexual violence was negatively associated with phobic anxiety.&nbsp; Intimate partner violence experiences were not related to participants? self-esteem.&nbsp; Implications for policy, practice, and early prevention/intervention strategies will be discussed.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:17:37Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:17:37Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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