2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/153469
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Decision Making for Cognitively Impaired Parents
Abstract:
Decision Making for Cognitively Impaired Parents
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2006
Author:Cook, Katharine C., PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:College of Notre Dame of Maryland
Title:Professor and Chair
Purpose: Few interpretive studies on adult children making care decisions for cognitively impaired parents limits our understanding of this important healthcare issue as the population ages. An informed understanding of this phenomenon would help to establish a foundation for: determining the assistance these families need, informing policy decisions about the fragmented care system for the cognitively impaired older adult, and decreasing the cost to society in lost productivity. Question: What is the experience of making care decisions for cognitively impaired parents? Method: Qualitative, Hermeneutic Phenomenology Sample: Purposeful sample; 22 adult offspring who self-identified as primary decision-makers for cognitively impaired parents, including 14 daughters, six sons and two daughters-in-law ranging in age from 35 to 64 years who were making decisions for parents 73 to 91 years of age. Procedure: Respondents were interviewed in their homes resulting in 35 hours of data. The use of ATLAS.ti software helped to organize data and audit decision making about themes. Saturation of themes assured trustworthiness. Findings: A reiterative decision-making process emerged with five phases, which participants would revisit in varying order when confronted with the need to make a care decision: Finding a Voice; Professing Fidelity; Speaking for the Speechless; Correcting Course; and Expressing Gratitude. Nineteen categories informed various themes
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDecision Making for Cognitively Impaired Parentsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/153469-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Decision Making for Cognitively Impaired Parents</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Cook, Katharine C., PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">College of Notre Dame of Maryland</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor and Chair</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">kcook@ndm.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Few interpretive studies on adult children making care decisions for cognitively impaired parents limits our understanding of this important healthcare issue as the population ages. An informed understanding of this phenomenon would help to establish a foundation for: determining the assistance these families need, informing policy decisions about the fragmented care system for the cognitively impaired older adult, and decreasing the cost to society in lost productivity. Question: What is the experience of making care decisions for cognitively impaired parents? Method: Qualitative, Hermeneutic Phenomenology Sample: Purposeful sample; 22 adult offspring who self-identified as primary decision-makers for cognitively impaired parents, including 14 daughters, six sons and two daughters-in-law ranging in age from 35 to 64 years who were making decisions for parents 73 to 91 years of age. Procedure: Respondents were interviewed in their homes resulting in 35 hours of data. The use of ATLAS.ti software helped to organize data and audit decision making about themes. Saturation of themes assured trustworthiness. Findings: A reiterative decision-making process emerged with five phases, which participants would revisit in varying order when confronted with the need to make a care decision: Finding a Voice; Professing Fidelity; Speaking for the Speechless; Correcting Course; and Expressing Gratitude. Nineteen categories informed various themes</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:17:40Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:17:40Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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