2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/153471
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Body Image, Body Weight, and African American Women
Abstract:
Body Image, Body Weight, and African American Women
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2006
Author:Coverson, Dorothy, RN, MSN
P.I. Institution Name:Emory University
Title:PhD Student
Co-Authors:Ora Strickland, RN, PhD
Background: African American women (AAW) have the highest rates of overweight and obesity of any group, and report less self-esteem disturbances, body image disturbances, and body size dissatisfaction at higher BMI?s than Caucasian women (CW). African Americans have been found to favor larger body sizes in AAW and Caucasians have been found to favor smaller body sizes in CW. These sociocultural factors translate into social constructions of weight preferences in women. Purpose: To develop a culturally sensitive measure of perceptions of weight in AAW.  Methods: A cultural studies analysis of representations of women in American culture: Mammy, Aunt Jemima, Barbie, and Twiggy tropes, a feminist analysis, and a literature review from 1980?2005 using MEDLINE, CINAHL, and PSYCHINFO was conducted .Results: No measure to assess perceptions of weight in AAW was discovered. A 30-item measure, the Weight Perception and Control Scale (WPCS), was constructed.  The tool was derived from a concept analysis of weight and contains three subscales: self-image/weight control, social support/weight control, and weight management. Items are scored on a 5-point Likert scale with scores ranging from 30-150. Discussion: Findings from the cultural studies and feminist analysis, the literature review, and pilot test of the WPCS will be presented.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBody Image, Body Weight, and African American Womenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/153471-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Body Image, Body Weight, and African American Women</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Coverson, Dorothy, RN, MSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Emory University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">PhD Student</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">dcovers@emory.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Ora Strickland, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: African American women (AAW) have the highest rates of overweight and obesity of any group, and report less self-esteem disturbances, body image disturbances, and body size dissatisfaction at higher BMI?s than Caucasian women (CW). African Americans have been found to favor larger body sizes in AAW and Caucasians have been found to favor smaller body sizes in CW. These sociocultural factors translate into social constructions of weight preferences in women. Purpose: To develop a culturally sensitive measure of perceptions of weight in AAW.&nbsp; Methods: A cultural studies analysis of representations of women in American culture: Mammy, Aunt Jemima, Barbie, and Twiggy tropes, a feminist analysis, and a literature review from 1980?2005 using MEDLINE, CINAHL, and PSYCHINFO was conducted .Results: No measure to assess perceptions of weight in AAW was discovered. A 30-item measure, the Weight Perception and Control Scale (WPCS), was constructed.&nbsp; The tool was derived from a concept analysis of weight and contains three subscales: self-image/weight control, social support/weight control, and weight management. Items are scored on a 5-point Likert scale with scores ranging from 30-150. Discussion: Findings from the cultural studies and feminist analysis, the literature review, and pilot test of the WPCS will be presented.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:17:44Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:17:44Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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