2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/153476
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Violence in Healthcare: Impact on the Nursing Community
Abstract:
Violence in Healthcare: Impact on the Nursing Community
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2006
Author:Ditmer, Dianne, PhD, RN, DABFN, SANE-A
P.I. Institution Name:Kettering Medical Center
Title:Clinical Educator
Co-Authors:Jennifer Malek, MSN, CS, APRN, BC
Nurses, who are both victims and perpetrators of violence, frequently do not recognize the acute and chronic impact of workplace violence on personal health and professional satisfaction. The purpose of this study is to identify the types and consequences of violent behaviors reported by nurses within a community based, healthcare network. This study is unique as it examines and correlates nurse?s exposure to a full continuum of workplace violence in relationship their physical and emotional response. The hypotheses for this study are: Acute and chronic exposure to workplace violence leads to a decrease in nursing satisfaction and retention. Disruptive behavior in the clinical setting contributes to physical and psychological illness including emotional distress.  The research design for this study includes a confidential, self-report questionnaire based upon literature review of related topics including workplace violence, violence against nurses, nursing culture, medical hierarchy, stress, and nurse retention. Nursing staff were asked to identify types of violent behaviors experienced, frequency, source, and the physical and emotional response to each violent episode. Demographic data including gender, ethnicity, years working in nursing, and educational level attained are correlated with the frequency and types of violence reported in the questionnaires. Research findings support the hypotheses as 88.9% of the respondents report experiencing workplace violence, 52.2% thought about quitting, 15.1% experienced physical illness, and 85.2% experienced emotional distress. Based upon these findings, a violence prevention program was developed for the host hospital with implications for the discipline of nursing and the healthcare community.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleViolence in Healthcare: Impact on the Nursing Communityen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/153476-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Violence in Healthcare: Impact on the Nursing Community</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Ditmer, Dianne, PhD, RN, DABFN, SANE-A</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Kettering Medical Center</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Clinical Educator</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">dianne.ditmer@kmcnetwork.org</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Jennifer Malek, MSN, CS, APRN, BC</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Nurses, who are both victims and perpetrators of violence, frequently do not recognize the acute and chronic impact of workplace violence on personal health and professional satisfaction. The purpose of this study is to identify the types and consequences of violent behaviors reported by nurses within a community based, healthcare network. This study is unique as it examines and correlates nurse?s exposure to a full continuum of workplace violence in relationship their physical and emotional response. The hypotheses for this study are: Acute and chronic exposure to workplace violence leads to a decrease in nursing satisfaction and retention. Disruptive behavior in the clinical setting contributes to physical and psychological illness including emotional distress.&nbsp; The research design for this study includes a confidential, self-report questionnaire based upon literature review of related topics including workplace violence, violence against nurses, nursing culture, medical hierarchy, stress, and nurse retention. Nursing staff were asked to identify types of violent behaviors experienced, frequency, source, and the physical and emotional response to each violent episode. Demographic data including gender, ethnicity, years working in nursing, and educational level attained are correlated with the frequency and types of violence reported in the questionnaires. Research findings support the hypotheses as 88.9% of the respondents report experiencing workplace violence, 52.2% thought about quitting, 15.1% experienced physical illness, and 85.2% experienced emotional distress. Based upon these findings, a violence prevention program was developed for the host hospital with implications for the discipline of nursing and the healthcare community.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:17:56Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:17:56Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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