Building a Diverse Nursing Workforce: The Influence of Personal Values on Career Choice

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/153477
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Building a Diverse Nursing Workforce: The Influence of Personal Values on Career Choice
Abstract:
Building a Diverse Nursing Workforce: The Influence of Personal Values on Career Choice
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2006
Author:Dominiak, Mary C., RN, MSN, MBA
P.I. Institution Name:Loyola University Chicago
Title:PhD Candidate
White/Caucasians represent 88% of the U.S. registered nurse population and 68% of the general population (American Nurses Association, 2000). The Institute of Medicine (2004) suggests that greater diversity among healthcare professionals is associated with improved outcomes for underserved populations. Therefore, the nursing profession must increase the number of nurses from underserved populations in order to meet the healthcare needs on an increasingly diverse U.S. population.  The purpose of this research is to explore the relationship between personal values in racial/ethnic groups and perceptions of nursing as a career choice.  Branding theory suggests that there is a relationship between personal values and brand (career) choice. Further, career development literature suggests that personal values vary across cultural groups (Brown, 2002). A branding theoretical model developed by the researcher serves as the study?s theoretical framework.  Findings from this study will inform nursing leaders of the need for specific, values-based recruitment messages, targeted towards potential students from diverse cultural backgrounds, which should be utilized to enhance diversity in the nursing profession. Further, evaluation of the use of student e-mails as a recruitment tool along with the use of a web-based survey will support use of technology in nursing research. A web-based survey is being used to gather anonymous information from undergraduate students from a Midwestern university. A disproportionate, stratified random sample of 900 students representing four cultural/ethnic groups has been drawn. Data will be collected using the Life Values Inventory (Brown and Crace, 2002), the Attitudes Towards Nursing as a Career Scale (May, Austin, and Champion, 1998) and a personal demographic tool developed by the researcher. IRB approval and permission to use the tools have been obtained. The web site has been designed. Data collection is scheduled to begin in mid-January, 2006 and data analysis will be completed and findings available in May, 2006.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBuilding a Diverse Nursing Workforce: The Influence of Personal Values on Career Choiceen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/153477-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Building a Diverse Nursing Workforce: The Influence of Personal Values on Career Choice</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Dominiak, Mary C., RN, MSN, MBA</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Loyola University Chicago</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">PhD Candidate</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mdomini@luc.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">White/Caucasians represent 88% of the U.S. registered nurse population and 68% of the general population (American Nurses Association, 2000). The Institute of Medicine (2004) suggests that greater diversity among healthcare professionals is associated with improved outcomes for underserved populations. Therefore, the nursing profession must increase the number of nurses from underserved populations in order to meet the healthcare needs on an increasingly diverse U.S. population.&nbsp; The purpose of this research is to explore the relationship between personal values in racial/ethnic groups and perceptions of nursing as a career choice.&nbsp; Branding theory suggests that there is a relationship between personal values and brand (career) choice. Further, career development literature suggests that personal values vary across cultural groups (Brown, 2002). A branding theoretical model developed by the researcher serves as the study?s theoretical framework.&nbsp; Findings from this study will inform nursing leaders of the need for specific, values-based recruitment messages, targeted towards potential students from diverse cultural backgrounds, which should be utilized to enhance diversity in the nursing profession. Further, evaluation of the use of student e-mails as a recruitment tool along with the use of a web-based survey will support use of technology in nursing research. A web-based survey is being used to gather anonymous information from undergraduate students from a Midwestern university. A disproportionate, stratified random sample of 900 students representing four cultural/ethnic groups has been drawn. Data will be collected using the Life Values Inventory (Brown and Crace, 2002), the Attitudes Towards Nursing as a Career Scale (May, Austin, and Champion, 1998) and a personal demographic tool developed by the researcher. IRB approval and permission to use the tools have been obtained. The web site has been designed. Data collection is scheduled to begin in mid-January, 2006 and data analysis will be completed and findings available in May, 2006.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:17:58Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:17:58Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.