Understanding Health Attitudes and Behaviors in Carriacou, Grenada: Applying the Cognitive Activation Theory of Stress (CATS)

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/153478
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Understanding Health Attitudes and Behaviors in Carriacou, Grenada: Applying the Cognitive Activation Theory of Stress (CATS)
Abstract:
Understanding Health Attitudes and Behaviors in Carriacou, Grenada: Applying the Cognitive Activation Theory of Stress (CATS)
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2006
Author:Dozier, Ann M., RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Rochester
Title:Assistant Professor
Co-Authors:Robert Block, MD; Trevlyn Cox, ; Deborah Levy, MD; Eugena Noel, ; Timothy D. Dye, PhD
Rapid Assessment Protocols are useful in formative stages of screening and intervention programs, but utilization of analyses and results is inconsistent and not well defined. Carriacou, Grenada?s second largest island (~5,500 inhabitants) an early site for the Grenada Heart Project, a study of cardiovascular risk among a population early in the epidemiologic transition. A mixed gendered US/Carriacou team deployed a Rapid Assessment Protocol based on pre-identified domains relevant to cardiovascular health. Following participant observation (3 days) and 25 semi-interviews (health, government, business owners leaders), analyses employing iterative processes were used to identify key themes. Findings were organized using Ursin?s Cognitive Activation Theory of Stress model (CATS). Ursin refers to ?load? as stimuli experienced by individuals potentially resulting in psychological stress (alarm) leading to feedback which can further increase ?load?. Ursin emphasizes individuals? unique internalization of ?load? determining a stimuli?s positive or adverse health consequences. Load for Carriacou adults included family histories (diabetes, hypertension), poor health habits, a lack of family/household resources, work demands, poor health care access, experience and attitude about health services, knowledge about cardiovascular health, migration, social involvement and environment (political, physical). ?Load? internalization resulted in uncertainty about health, grounded in a perceived lack of control over one?s current and future health, mistrust of the health system, and fear of loss associated with illness. Few adults sought information or screening for known familial conditions. By contrast, functional limitations affecting ability to work were strong motivators. Health seeking behaviors included exercise, dieting, and seeking medical care for illness confirmation. Individuals were likely to use alternative treatments (?bush medicine?) rather than prescribed pharmaceuticals. The CATS model can be effectively applied to cardiovascular health improvement programs taking into account this population?s uncertainty about health and lack of control, lack of knowledge, the value of maintaining functionality, and preferences for non-pharmaceutical treatments.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleUnderstanding Health Attitudes and Behaviors in Carriacou, Grenada: Applying the Cognitive Activation Theory of Stress (CATS)en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/153478-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Understanding Health Attitudes and Behaviors in Carriacou, Grenada: Applying the Cognitive Activation Theory of Stress (CATS)</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Dozier, Ann M., RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Rochester</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">ann_dozier@urmc.rochester.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Robert Block, MD; Trevlyn Cox, ; Deborah Levy, MD; Eugena Noel, ; Timothy D. Dye, PhD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Rapid Assessment Protocols are useful in formative stages of screening and intervention programs, but utilization of analyses and results is inconsistent and not well defined. Carriacou, Grenada?s second largest island (~5,500 inhabitants) an early site for the Grenada Heart Project, a study of cardiovascular risk among a population early in the epidemiologic transition. A mixed gendered US/Carriacou team deployed a Rapid Assessment Protocol based on pre-identified domains relevant to cardiovascular health. Following participant observation (3 days) and 25 semi-interviews (health, government, business owners leaders), analyses employing iterative processes were used to identify key themes. Findings were organized using Ursin?s Cognitive Activation Theory of Stress model (CATS). Ursin refers to ?load? as stimuli experienced by individuals potentially resulting in psychological stress (alarm) leading to feedback which can further increase ?load?. Ursin emphasizes individuals? unique internalization of ?load? determining a stimuli?s positive or adverse health consequences. Load for Carriacou adults included family histories (diabetes, hypertension), poor health habits, a lack of family/household resources, work demands, poor health care access, experience and attitude about health services, knowledge about cardiovascular health, migration, social involvement and environment (political, physical). ?Load? internalization resulted in uncertainty about health, grounded in a perceived lack of control over one?s current and future health, mistrust of the health system, and fear of loss associated with illness. Few adults sought information or screening for known familial conditions. By contrast, functional limitations affecting ability to work were strong motivators. Health seeking behaviors included exercise, dieting, and seeking medical care for illness confirmation. Individuals were likely to use alternative treatments (?bush medicine?) rather than prescribed pharmaceuticals. The CATS model can be effectively applied to cardiovascular health improvement programs taking into account this population?s uncertainty about health and lack of control, lack of knowledge, the value of maintaining functionality, and preferences for non-pharmaceutical treatments.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:18:00Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:18:00Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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