A Collaborative Research Utilization Approach to Translating Best Practices: Outcomes in Patients, Clinicians, Students, and Faculty

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/153479
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Collaborative Research Utilization Approach to Translating Best Practices: Outcomes in Patients, Clinicians, Students, and Faculty
Abstract:
A Collaborative Research Utilization Approach to Translating Best Practices: Outcomes in Patients, Clinicians, Students, and Faculty
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2006
Author:Dufault, Marlene A., PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Rhode Island
Co-Authors:Suzanne Tracy, PhD, RN
This paper focuses on a program of translation research in which the intervention, called the Collaborative Model of Research Utilization was developed as a research trajectory between nurses in academe and practice. Contextual factors related to the historical development of the translation model, the model's structure, its six steps, and its relationship to Roger's Theory on the Adoption of Innovations is discussed. A summary of 7 studies including their design, methods, instruments, and analysis used to measure evidence uptake and patient, clinician, student, and faculty outcomes is presented. Lessons learned about translation science and sustainability in each of the studies is examined including: assessing and creating infra-structural support, determining the ease of policy change, creating a translation research team, dealing with wide variations in expectations and in research competencies, minimizing hospital resource consumption, accessing the literature, minimizing the burden of data collection, selecting instruments for outcome measures, using documentation systems in data collection, obtaining formal support and IRB approval, analyzing translation research data including treatment of data and site location issues. Over 20 years of using this CRU translation model has given us insights into this intervention that can facilitate successful integration of evidence-based interventions into the clinical environment. Other translation research questions for further study are explored. These include the need to examine the effect of differences in potentially confounding variables, and the use of mixed methods, both qualitative and quantitative with triangulation of data and method that may give us greater insight into the very complex process of translation research.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Collaborative Research Utilization Approach to Translating Best Practices: Outcomes in Patients, Clinicians, Students, and Facultyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/153479-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">A Collaborative Research Utilization Approach to Translating Best Practices: Outcomes in Patients, Clinicians, Students, and Faculty</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Dufault, Marlene A., PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Rhode Island</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Marlened@uri.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Suzanne Tracy, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">This paper focuses on a program of translation research in which the intervention, called the Collaborative Model of Research Utilization was developed as a research trajectory between nurses in academe and practice. Contextual factors related to the historical development of the translation model, the model's structure, its six steps, and its relationship to Roger's Theory on the Adoption of Innovations is discussed. A summary of 7 studies including their design, methods, instruments, and analysis used to measure evidence uptake and patient, clinician, student, and faculty outcomes is presented. Lessons learned about translation science and sustainability in each of the studies is examined including: assessing and creating infra-structural support, determining the ease of policy change, creating a translation research team, dealing with wide variations in expectations and in research competencies, minimizing hospital resource consumption, accessing the literature, minimizing the burden of data collection, selecting instruments for outcome measures, using documentation systems in data collection, obtaining formal support and IRB approval, analyzing translation research data including treatment of data and site location issues. Over 20 years of using this CRU translation model has given us insights into this intervention that can facilitate successful integration of evidence-based interventions into the clinical environment. Other translation research questions for further study are explored. These include the need to examine the effect of differences in potentially confounding variables, and the use of mixed methods, both qualitative and quantitative with triangulation of data and method that may give us greater insight into the very complex process of translation research.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:18:03Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:18:03Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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