2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/153487
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Diversity and Homelessness: Minorities and Psychiatric Survivors
Abstract:
Diversity and Homelessness: Minorities and Psychiatric Survivors
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2006
Author:Forchuk, Cheryl, RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Western Ontario/Lawson Health Research Institute
Title:Professor/Scientist
Co-Authors:Elsabeth Jensen, RN, PhD; Helene Berman, RN, PhD; Rick Csiernik, MSW, PhD, RSW; Carolyne Gorlick, PhD; Pamela McKane, BA, MA; Libbey Joplin, BA, MTS, CAPE
This study explores the intersecting vulnerabilities among individuals who are homeless and have psychiatric challenges. Psychiatric survivors are often perceived as a homogenous group with similar needs. However, survivors with minority status are likely to have additional concerns that may not be met by the current systems of care. People further marginalized by visible minority/cultural minority group status, sexual orientation, and/or disabilities are being studied. While belonging to any of these groups can increase the risk for poverty and homelessness, interaction among these vulnerabilities is poorly understood, particularly in relation to housing and homelessness.  Secondary analysis of was data collected through the Housing and Mental Health CURA. These data were provided by 320 people.  Results: Data related to race/ethnicity, disabilities, and sexual orientation were explored to learn more about how these characteristics relate to use of health care services, housing, quality of life, status of personal support networks, severity of illness, and level of functioning. Caucasians are more likely to be housed than non-Caucasians, while aboriginal people are over-represented in the shelter group (?2 =10.202, p=.037). There was no difference between groups on the basis of current housing or visible minority group membership in the use of hospital services in the month prior to the interview. In the preceding 2 years, people of aboriginal or mixed culture/ethnicity showed a trend towards significantly more housing changes (f=2.605, df=3,249, p=.05), as did homelessness at the time of the interview (f=73.888, df=2, 251, p=.000). Conclusions: Results will inform policy and care models to better meet the needs of people with minority group characteristics.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDiversity and Homelessness: Minorities and Psychiatric Survivorsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/153487-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Diversity and Homelessness: Minorities and Psychiatric Survivors</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Forchuk, Cheryl, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Western Ontario/Lawson Health Research Institute</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor/Scientist</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">cforchuk@uwo.ca</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Elsabeth Jensen, RN, PhD; Helene Berman, RN, PhD; Rick Csiernik, MSW, PhD, RSW; Carolyne Gorlick, PhD; Pamela McKane, BA, MA; Libbey Joplin, BA, MTS, CAPE</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">This study explores the intersecting vulnerabilities among individuals who are homeless and have psychiatric challenges. Psychiatric survivors are often perceived as a homogenous group with similar needs. However, survivors with minority status are likely to have additional concerns that may not be met by the current systems of care. People further marginalized by visible minority/cultural minority group status, sexual orientation, and/or disabilities are being studied. While belonging to any of these groups can increase the risk for poverty and homelessness, interaction among these vulnerabilities is poorly understood, particularly in relation to housing and homelessness.&nbsp; Secondary analysis of was data collected through the Housing and Mental Health CURA. These data were provided by 320 people. &nbsp;Results: Data related to race/ethnicity, disabilities, and sexual orientation were explored to learn more about how these characteristics relate to use of health care services, housing, quality of life, status of personal support networks, severity of illness, and level of functioning. Caucasians are more likely to be housed than non-Caucasians, while aboriginal people are over-represented in the shelter group (?2 =10.202, p=.037). There was no difference between groups on the basis of current housing or visible minority group membership in the use of hospital services in the month prior to the interview. In the preceding 2 years, people of aboriginal or mixed culture/ethnicity showed a trend towards significantly more housing changes (f=2.605, df=3,249, p=.05), as did homelessness at the time of the interview (f=73.888, df=2, 251, p=.000).&nbsp;Conclusions: Results will inform policy and care models to better meet the needs of people with minority group characteristics.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:18:23Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:18:23Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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