Toward Evidence-Based Nursing Care for Adult Surgical Patients: An Integrative Review of Hypothermia Interventions

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/153488
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Toward Evidence-Based Nursing Care for Adult Surgical Patients: An Integrative Review of Hypothermia Interventions
Abstract:
Toward Evidence-Based Nursing Care for Adult Surgical Patients: An Integrative Review of Hypothermia Interventions
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2006
Author:Galvao, Cristina Maria, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Sao Paulo
Title:Associate Professor
Co-Authors:Alexander M. Clark, PhD, BA, RN; Patricia B. Marck, PhD; Namie Okino Sawada, PhD
Aims: The aims of this study were to 1) retrieve and critique current research on the cutaneous warming systems presently used to prevent hypothermia in adult surgical patients during the intra-operative period; and 2) identify critical gaps in current evidence and future directions for nursing research. Background: Hypothermia affects 60% - 90% of anesthetized surgical patients and is associated with an increased incidence of impaired coagulation, wound infection, pressure ulcers, morbid cardiac events, and mortality. Clear evidence on the benefits and limits of various cutaneous warming systems is needed to minimize the dangers of hypothermia and improve the outcomes of surgical care.  Methods: We searched the 2000 ? 2005 timeframe in the CINAHL, EMBASE and Medline databases for reports on randomized, controlled trials of cutaneous warming systems used with adult, elective surgical patients during the intra-operative period. We included studies with adequate information on randomization and attrition in our review. Results: Fifteen (15) studies on active cutaneous warming systems meeting the inclusion criteria were reviewed for evidence on patient outcomes, nursing workload, ecological considerations such as waste generation, and overall cost-effectiveness. The warming systems examined included cotton blankets, forced air, circulating water garments, resistive heating blankets, radiant warming devices, circulating water mattresses, and reflective blankets. While the evidence to date suggests that several types of warming systems maintain an acceptable intra-operative body temperature, critical evidence on patient outcomes, nursing workload, ecological load, and cost-effectiveness is minimal or absent. Conclusions: Nurses need to lead further research on intra-operative warming systems to examine key nursing-sensitive patient outcomes, nursing workload, ecological considerations, and the overall cost-effectiveness of care. The evidence generated through nursing research will enable us to knowledgably plan and deliver safer intra-operative patient care at a cost that our health systems and societies can afford to pay.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleToward Evidence-Based Nursing Care for Adult Surgical Patients: An Integrative Review of Hypothermia Interventionsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/153488-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Toward Evidence-Based Nursing Care for Adult Surgical Patients: An Integrative Review of Hypothermia Interventions</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Galvao, Cristina Maria, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Sao Paulo</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">crisgalv@eerp.usp.br</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Alexander M. Clark, PhD, BA, RN; Patricia B. Marck, PhD; Namie Okino Sawada, PhD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Aims: The aims of this study were to 1) retrieve and critique current research on the cutaneous warming systems presently used to prevent hypothermia in adult surgical patients during the intra-operative period; and 2) identify critical gaps in current evidence and future directions for nursing research. Background: Hypothermia affects 60% - 90% of anesthetized surgical patients and is associated with an increased incidence of impaired coagulation, wound infection, pressure ulcers, morbid cardiac events, and mortality. Clear evidence on the benefits and limits of various cutaneous warming systems is needed to minimize the dangers of hypothermia and improve the outcomes of surgical care. &nbsp;Methods: We searched the 2000 ? 2005 timeframe in the CINAHL, EMBASE and Medline databases for reports on randomized, controlled trials of cutaneous warming systems used with adult, elective surgical patients during the intra-operative period. We included studies with adequate information on randomization and attrition in our review.&nbsp;Results: Fifteen (15) studies on active cutaneous warming systems meeting the inclusion criteria were reviewed for evidence on patient outcomes, nursing workload, ecological considerations such as waste generation, and overall cost-effectiveness. The warming systems examined included cotton blankets, forced air, circulating water garments, resistive heating blankets, radiant warming devices, circulating water mattresses, and reflective blankets. While the evidence to date suggests that several types of warming systems maintain an acceptable intra-operative body temperature, critical evidence on patient outcomes, nursing workload, ecological load, and cost-effectiveness is minimal or absent. Conclusions: Nurses need to lead further research on intra-operative warming systems to examine key nursing-sensitive patient outcomes, nursing workload, ecological considerations, and the overall cost-effectiveness of care. The evidence generated through nursing research will enable us to knowledgably plan and deliver safer intra-operative patient care at a cost that our health systems and societies can afford to pay.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:18:26Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:18:26Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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