2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/153489
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Using Music Therapy for Patient Symptom Management
Abstract:
Using Music Therapy for Patient Symptom Management
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2006
Author:Gardner, Kathryn G., EdD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Rochester General Hospital
Title:Director of Nursing Research
Co-Authors:Bryan C. Hunter, PhD, MT-BC
Acute care hospitals have started to use music therapy as an adjunct therapy.  However the research findings are mixed as to the effectiveness of this therapy.  Part of this problem is due to small sample studies.   This study measured the effects of nurse-referred patients for music therapy. The hypothesis was that there would be a significant reduction in patient symptom severity, when measured pre and post music therapy intervention, for patients receiving music therapy, compared to patients that did not receive music therapy (control group). The study had 100 patients, all referred to the program by their nurse caregivers. Referral reasons were as follows: Agitation, Restlessness (inability to relax),      Anxiety, Feelings of Sadness, Pain, Discomfort (consolation in time of trouble or worry), Patient or Family Request, Other as considered appropriate by the nurse caregiver. Two hospital units were used (medical and orthopedic), each with 50 patients. Of each unit?s patients, 25 enrolled in the music therapy group and 25 enrolled in the control group, using blind randomization. The data were examined using descriptive statistics, plots, parametric and nonparametric statistical analyses. Statistical significance was detected at alpha = 0.05. Music therapy patients had statistically significant reductions in severity of pain, discomfort and sadness compared to control. Borderline not statistically significant reduction was indicated for anxiety. Control patients had statistically significant reductions in discomfort and borderline not statistically significant reduction in pain. Control reductions were significantly less than music therapy reductions. Our conclusions were: 1) Music therapy was effective in reducing the severity of some symptoms in patients who received the intervention, and. 2) Music therapy is a useful tool to managing symptoms for patients in medical and orthopedic units of a general hospital.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleUsing Music Therapy for Patient Symptom Managementen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/153489-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Using Music Therapy for Patient Symptom Management</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Gardner, Kathryn G., EdD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Rochester General Hospital</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Director of Nursing Research</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">kathryn.gardner@viahealth.org</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Bryan C. Hunter, PhD, MT-BC</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Acute care hospitals have started to use music therapy as an adjunct therapy.&nbsp; However the research findings are mixed as to the effectiveness of this therapy.&nbsp; Part of this problem is due to small sample studies. &nbsp;&nbsp;This study measured the effects of nurse-referred patients for music therapy. The hypothesis was that there would be a significant reduction in patient symptom severity, when measured pre and post music therapy intervention, for patients receiving music therapy, compared to patients that did not receive music therapy (control group). The study had 100 patients, all referred to the program by their nurse caregivers. Referral reasons were as follows: Agitation, Restlessness (inability to relax), &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Anxiety, Feelings of Sadness, Pain,&nbsp;Discomfort (consolation in time of trouble or worry), Patient or Family Request, Other as considered appropriate by the nurse caregiver. Two hospital units were used (medical and orthopedic), each with 50 patients. Of each unit?s patients, 25 enrolled in the music therapy group and 25 enrolled in the control group, using blind randomization. The data were examined using descriptive statistics, plots, parametric and nonparametric statistical analyses. Statistical significance was detected at alpha = 0.05. Music therapy patients had statistically significant reductions in severity of pain, discomfort and sadness compared to control. Borderline not statistically significant reduction was indicated for anxiety. Control patients had statistically significant reductions in discomfort and borderline not statistically significant reduction in pain. Control reductions were significantly less than music therapy reductions. Our conclusions were: 1) Music therapy was effective in reducing the severity of some symptoms in patients who received the intervention, and. 2) Music therapy is a useful tool to managing symptoms for patients in medical and orthopedic units of a general hospital.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:18:28Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:18:28Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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