Fatalism and HIV/AIDS: A Comparison Study of Mali, West Africa and Midwest United States

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/153495
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Fatalism and HIV/AIDS: A Comparison Study of Mali, West Africa and Midwest United States
Abstract:
Fatalism and HIV/AIDS: A Comparison Study of Mali, West Africa and Midwest United States
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2006
Author:Hess, Rosanna, RN, DNP, MSN, MA
P.I. Institution Name:Malone College
Title:Adjunct faculty
Problem:  Fatalism is the belief that a superior power or force outside a person?s control predetermines the course of one's life.  It may lead to a passive resignation of life?s circumstances.  The level of fatalism towards HIV/AIDS prevention in African and United States populations is not known.  Purpose:  The purpose of this study was to compare the scores for fatalism towards HIV/AIDS in rural Mali, West Africa and in the midwestern United States. Theoretical Framework:  Powe Fatalism Model.  Design:  A descriptive, non experimental design guided the research process.  Sample:  83 individuals in Mali and 39 individuals in the United States completed the Powe Fatalism Inventory ? HIV/AIDS Version.  Findings:  On a scale of 0 to 15, the Malian mean score was 8.7, with a dispersion of scores from 0 to 15, at a reliability factor of an alpha of .89.  Malian women were more fatalistic than Malian men.  In the United States sample the mean score was 2.7, with a dispersion of scores from 0 to 10, at a reliability factor of an alpha of .77.  Implications:  The Malian sample was more fatalistic than the United States sample.  People who believe that little if anything can be done to prevent AIDS will continue risky behaviors leading to HIV transmission.  Health care personnel involved in AIDS education should tailor prevention strategies to issues of external locus of control in a fatalistic population or with fatalistic individuals.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFatalism and HIV/AIDS: A Comparison Study of Mali, West Africa and Midwest United Statesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/153495-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Fatalism and HIV/AIDS: A Comparison Study of Mali, West Africa and Midwest United States</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hess, Rosanna, RN, DNP, MSN, MA</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Malone College</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Adjunct faculty</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">rosannahess@hotmail.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Problem:&nbsp; Fatalism is the belief that a superior power or force outside a person?s control predetermines the course of one's life.&nbsp; It may lead to a passive resignation of life?s circumstances.&nbsp; The level of fatalism towards HIV/AIDS prevention in African and United States populations is not known.&nbsp; Purpose:&nbsp; The purpose of this study was to compare the scores for fatalism towards HIV/AIDS in rural Mali, West Africa and in the midwestern United States. Theoretical Framework:&nbsp; Powe Fatalism Model.&nbsp; Design:&nbsp; A descriptive, non experimental design guided the research process.&nbsp; Sample:&nbsp; 83 individuals in Mali and 39 individuals in the United States completed the Powe Fatalism Inventory ? HIV/AIDS Version.&nbsp; Findings:&nbsp; On a scale of 0 to 15, the Malian mean score was 8.7, with a dispersion of scores from 0 to 15, at a reliability factor of an alpha of .89.&nbsp; Malian women were more fatalistic than Malian men.&nbsp; In the United States sample the mean score was 2.7, with a dispersion of scores from 0 to 10, at a reliability factor of an alpha of .77.&nbsp; Implications:&nbsp; The Malian sample was more fatalistic than the United States sample.&nbsp; People who believe that little if anything can be done to prevent AIDS will continue risky behaviors leading to HIV transmission.&nbsp; Health care personnel involved in AIDS education should tailor prevention strategies&nbsp;to issues of external locus of control in a fatalistic population or with fatalistic individuals.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:18:43Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:18:43Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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