2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/153496
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Gender, Depression and Symptom Expression in a Cardiac Population
Abstract:
Gender, Depression and Symptom Expression in a Cardiac Population
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2006
Author:Hiscox, Heather, MPH
P.I. Institution Name:The University of Arizona
Title:Research Specialist
Co-Authors:Claire Venker, BS; Shu-Fen Wung, PhD, MS, RN
The purpose of this study is to determine how cardiac symptom presentation varies by gender and by level of depressive symptoms.     Methods: This sub-analysis included 461 subjects with suspected myocardial infarction enrolled in a prospective study.  The analysis included subjects under age 65 that completed the Beck Depression Inventory.  Depressive symptoms were defined as a score of =10.  Chi-square tests were used to determine whether symptom presentation varied between subjects with and without depressive symptoms and by gender.  Only those symptoms with a frequency of 10% or greater were reported.  Subjects were asked to indicate which words from a list of symptom descriptors matched their experience prior to their hospital visit.  Results: Men with depressive symptoms were more likely than those without to report pain (p=0.005), vise-like (p=0.017), suffocating (p<0.001), sharp (p=0.006), dizziness (p<0.001), sweating (p=0.002), general weakness (p=0.005), numbness and tingling in the hands (p=0.048), numbness and tingling in the feet (p=0.003), shortness of breath (p=0.001), lightheadedness (p=0.001), leg cramps (p=0.041), fearful or frightened (p=0.003), unusual fatigue/tiredness (p<0.001), headache (p=0.004), anxious/nervous (p=0.025), and hot sensation or flushed (p=0.002).  Women with depressive symptoms were more likely than those without to indicate they felt pressure (p=0.006), pain (p=0.047), discomfort (p=0.042), suffocating (p=0.021), and heaviness (p=0.003), nausea (p=0.001), vomiting (p=0.038), palpitations/funny beating of the heart (p=0.037), leg cramps (p=0.010), unusual fatigue/tiredness (p=0.038), headache (p=0.002), anxious/nervous (p=0.013), and hot sensation or flushed (p=0.020).  Women with depressive symptoms were more likely to report feeling pressure (p=0.023), heaviness (p=0.025), and nausea (p=0.011) than men with depressive symptoms.  Conclusions:  Men and women with depressive symptoms were more likely than those without to report certain cardiac symptoms. Among those with depressive symptoms, women were more likely than men to report pressure, heaviness and nausea. These differences must be considered when evaluating patients presenting with cardiac symptoms.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleGender, Depression and Symptom Expression in a Cardiac Populationen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/153496-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Gender, Depression and Symptom Expression in a Cardiac Population</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hiscox, Heather, MPH</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">The University of Arizona</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Research Specialist</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">hhiscox@nursing.arizona.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Claire Venker, BS; Shu-Fen Wung, PhD, MS, RN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this study is to determine how cardiac symptom presentation varies by gender and by level of depressive symptoms.&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Methods: This sub-analysis included 461 subjects with suspected myocardial infarction enrolled in a prospective study.&nbsp; The analysis included subjects under age 65 that completed the Beck Depression Inventory. &nbsp;Depressive symptoms were defined as a score of =10.&nbsp; Chi-square tests were used to determine whether symptom presentation varied between subjects with and without depressive symptoms and by gender.&nbsp; Only those symptoms with a frequency of 10% or greater were reported.&nbsp; Subjects were asked to indicate which words from a list of symptom descriptors matched their experience prior to their hospital visit.&nbsp; Results: Men with depressive symptoms were more likely than those without to report pain (p=0.005), vise-like (p=0.017), suffocating (p&lt;0.001), sharp (p=0.006), dizziness (p&lt;0.001), sweating (p=0.002), general weakness (p=0.005), numbness and tingling in the hands (p=0.048), numbness and tingling in the feet (p=0.003), shortness of breath (p=0.001), lightheadedness (p=0.001), leg cramps (p=0.041), fearful or frightened (p=0.003), unusual fatigue/tiredness (p&lt;0.001), headache (p=0.004), anxious/nervous (p=0.025), and hot sensation or flushed (p=0.002).&nbsp; Women with depressive symptoms were more likely than those without to indicate they felt pressure (p=0.006), pain (p=0.047), discomfort (p=0.042), suffocating (p=0.021), and heaviness (p=0.003), nausea (p=0.001), vomiting (p=0.038), palpitations/funny beating of the heart (p=0.037), leg cramps (p=0.010), unusual fatigue/tiredness (p=0.038), headache (p=0.002), anxious/nervous (p=0.013), and hot sensation or flushed (p=0.020).&nbsp; Women with depressive symptoms were more likely to report feeling pressure (p=0.023), heaviness (p=0.025), and nausea (p=0.011) than men with depressive symptoms.&nbsp; Conclusions:&nbsp; Men and women with depressive symptoms were more likely than those without to report certain cardiac symptoms. Among those with depressive symptoms, women were more likely than men to report pressure, heaviness and nausea. These differences must be considered when evaluating patients presenting with cardiac symptoms.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:18:45Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:18:45Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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