2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/153498
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Study of Falls in a Specific Nursing Home Population
Abstract:
A Study of Falls in a Specific Nursing Home Population
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2006
Author:Hudson, Lisa L., MSN, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Oklahoma City University
Title:Legal Nurse Consultant/Associate Professor
Falls in the elderly represent a serious problem in relation to morbidity and mortality in nursing home residents. In this healthcare environment, falls occur so often that the complications of falls are often overlooked and underreported. As our population ages, numbers of elderly requiring residential care will increase, further impacting the risk of injury and death from preventable falls in this population. While it is possible that all falls are not preventable, it is the duty of the healthcare worker to attempt to reduce the potential for falls with knowledge and understanding of the phenomena of fall factors. Effective and successful fall prevention programs can reduce the rate of falls in the elderly, thereby reducing complications associated with falls. There is sufficient documentation in recent literature to confirm that as a person ages, the risk of falling increases. Current literature suggests that ?fifty percent of long term care patients fall each year? with fall index rates calculated to be as high as ?4-12 falls per 1,000 bed days?. The study of the phenomena of falls is important to continue in the search for the best practice for the prevention of falls in the at risk population(s). It is possible to identify residents at risk of falling by understanding the nature of falls and providing ongoing education of direct care staff. Ongoing education, implementation of evidence based practices, and use of research based knowledge increases staff awareness of fall risk factors and serves as a conduit to write specific care plans and implement appropriate care to residents. While all falls can not be prevented, it is possible to reduce injuries associated with unpreventable falls. Reducing the number of falls and fall associated injuries will improve quality of life, decrease healthcare costs, and prevent costly litigation in relation to fall mortality.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Study of Falls in a Specific Nursing Home Populationen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/153498-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">A Study of Falls in a Specific Nursing Home Population</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hudson, Lisa L., MSN, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Oklahoma City University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Legal Nurse Consultant/Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Lisalegalnurse@cox.net</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Falls in the elderly represent a serious problem in relation to morbidity and mortality in nursing home residents. In this healthcare environment, falls occur so often that the complications of falls are often overlooked and underreported. As our population ages, numbers of elderly requiring residential care will increase, further impacting the risk of injury and death from preventable falls in this population. While it is possible that all falls are not preventable, it is the duty of the healthcare worker to attempt to reduce the potential for falls with knowledge and understanding of the phenomena of fall factors. Effective and successful fall prevention programs can reduce the rate of falls in the elderly, thereby reducing complications associated with falls. There is sufficient documentation in recent literature to confirm that as a person ages, the risk of falling increases. Current literature suggests that ?fifty percent of long term care patients fall each year? with fall index rates calculated to be as high as ?4-12 falls per 1,000 bed days?. The study of the phenomena of falls is important to continue in the search for the best practice for the prevention of falls in the at risk population(s). It is possible to identify residents at risk of falling by understanding the nature of falls and providing ongoing education of direct care staff. Ongoing education, implementation of evidence based practices, and use of research based knowledge increases staff awareness of fall risk factors and serves as a conduit to write specific care plans and implement appropriate care to residents. While all falls can not be prevented, it is possible to reduce injuries associated with unpreventable falls. Reducing the number of falls and fall associated injuries will improve quality of life, decrease healthcare costs, and prevent costly litigation in relation to fall mortality.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:18:50Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:18:50Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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