2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/153509
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Medication Administration in Resident-Centered Nursing Homes
Abstract:
Medication Administration in Resident-Centered Nursing Homes
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2006
Author:Krause, Melanie R.
P.I. Institution Name:University of Wisconsin-Madison
Title:Early Entry PhD Student
Co-Authors:Barbara J. Bowers, RN, PhD, FAAN
The negative effects of institutionalization on residents, including depression, decreased self-esteem and poor self-concept, have been well documented in the research literature.  In response, many nursing homes are participating in one of the resident-centered care initiatives.  Although many nursing homes claim to deliver resident-centered care, current definitions lack conceptual clarity and consistency.  Nurses are left confused about what resident-centered care is and how to implement the new model of care. Currently, there is a lack of understanding of the impact of resident-centered models of care on the nursing workforce. The purpose of this study is to describe how staff incorporate resident-centered models of care into medication passes. Data were gathered at two nursing homes in the Midwestern United States with resident-centered models of care.  A total of twenty nurses and medication assistants have participated.  This study employs a field research design, wherein participants are observed during medication passes and later interviewed. Field notes are recorded and interviews transcribed.  Data were analyzed using grounded dimensional analysis to develop theory about the way nurses and medication assistants conceptualize resident-centered care and they ways they incorporate the resident-centered care into their medication passes. There are several notable findings. First, while all staff strive to deliver resident-centered care, conceptualizations of resident-centered care vary across participants. Secondly, participants report conflicts between resident-centered ideals and nursing care standards. Finally, nurses and medication assistants report increased work loads and difficulty completing work within time constraints. The findings from this study will be useful for the future development of interventions to help nurses overcome barriers to implementation of resident-centered care. Nurses are frequently blamed for difficulties nursing homes experience when implementing resident-centered models of care. However, there is currently scare literature available that explores the barriers to implementation that nurses experience and how they overcome these obstacles.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMedication Administration in Resident-Centered Nursing Homesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/153509-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Medication Administration in Resident-Centered Nursing Homes</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Krause, Melanie R.</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Wisconsin-Madison</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Early Entry PhD Student</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">melkrause@yahoo.com</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Barbara J. Bowers, RN, PhD, FAAN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The negative effects of institutionalization on residents, including depression, decreased self-esteem and poor self-concept, have been well documented in the research literature.&nbsp; In response, many nursing homes are participating in one of the resident-centered care initiatives. &nbsp;Although many nursing homes claim to deliver resident-centered care, current definitions lack conceptual clarity and consistency.&nbsp; Nurses are left confused about what resident-centered care is and how to implement the new model of care.&nbsp;Currently, there is a lack of understanding of the impact of resident-centered models of care on the nursing workforce. The purpose of this study is to describe how staff incorporate resident-centered models of care into medication passes.&nbsp;Data were gathered at two nursing homes in the Midwestern United States with resident-centered models of care.&nbsp; A total of twenty nurses and medication assistants have participated.&nbsp; This study employs a field research design, wherein participants are observed during medication passes and later interviewed. Field notes are recorded and interviews transcribed.&nbsp; Data were analyzed using grounded dimensional analysis to develop theory about the way nurses and medication assistants conceptualize resident-centered care and they ways they incorporate the resident-centered care into their medication passes. There are several notable findings. First, while all staff strive to deliver resident-centered care, conceptualizations of resident-centered care vary across participants.&nbsp;Secondly, participants report conflicts between resident-centered ideals and nursing care standards. Finally, nurses and medication assistants report increased work loads and difficulty completing work within time constraints.&nbsp;The findings from this study will be useful for the future development of interventions to help nurses overcome barriers to implementation of resident-centered care. Nurses are frequently blamed for difficulties nursing homes experience when implementing resident-centered models of care.&nbsp;However, there is currently scare literature available that explores the barriers to implementation that nurses experience and how they overcome these obstacles.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:19:16Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:19:16Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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