2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/153510
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Ethics of Nursing Discourses During Wartime
Author(s):
Lagerwey, Mary D.
Abstract:
The Ethics of Nursing Discourses During Wartime
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2006
Author:Lagerwey, Mary D., PhD, MSN, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Western Michigan University
Title:Associate Professor
From the Crimean War, through the U. S. Civil War, two World Wars, the Vietnam Conflict, and the Iraq War today, wars have had significant implications for professional nursing. These implications are complex, as nurses in warring countries--individually and collectively--have at times behaved less than honorably. Perhaps the best-known example is the collaboration of individual German nurses and the acquiescence of much of German nursing during the Nazi period. Less is known about the ethical responses of nursing in Nazi-occupied countries, such as the Netherlands. In spite of its historical image of tolerance, the Netherlands lost 75 percent of its Jewish population of 140,000 during Nazi occupation -- the third highest percentage of victims in all of Europe, surpassed only by Germany and Poland.  In contrast to the easily accessible stories of resistance by the Dutch physicians? Medisch Contact, nursing stories from this period are difficult to find. Individual references to nurses can be found in the country?s literature on resistance, but the profession?s responses remain obscure. This paper adds to an understanding of nursing?s ethical responses to war and strife. It presents an analysis of official nursing discourses from the longest running Dutch nursing journal, the Tijdschrift voor Ziekenverpleging (TVZ, now the Tijdschrift voor Verpleegkundigen). Articles from 1940-1945 were analyzed in terms of relevant content, manner of presentation, contexts, and silences. The silences, in particular, reflect a decidedly a-political stance, avoiding support, criticism, or endorsement of political events. A comparison with findings from a previous analysis of a comparable U. S. journal, the American Journal of Nursing, for the same period, revealed similar silences. The paper ends with a discussion of implications of the nursing profession?s voice and silences in times of political strife and war.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
17th International Nursing Research Congress
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Montreal, Quebec, Canada
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Ethics of Nursing Discourses During Wartimeen_GB
dc.contributor.authorLagerwey, Mary D.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/153510-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Ethics of Nursing Discourses During Wartime</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Lagerwey, Mary D., PhD, MSN, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Western Michigan University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mary.lagerwey@wmich.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">From the Crimean War, through the U. S. Civil War, two World Wars, the Vietnam Conflict, and the Iraq War today, wars have had significant implications for professional nursing. These implications are complex, as nurses in warring countries--individually and collectively--have at times behaved less than honorably. Perhaps the best-known example is the collaboration of individual German nurses and the acquiescence of much of German nursing during the Nazi period. Less is known about the ethical responses of nursing in Nazi-occupied countries, such as the Netherlands. In spite of its historical image of tolerance, the Netherlands lost 75 percent of its Jewish population of 140,000 during Nazi occupation -- the third highest percentage of victims in all of Europe, surpassed only by Germany and Poland.  In contrast to the easily accessible stories of resistance by the Dutch physicians? Medisch Contact, nursing stories from this period are difficult to find. Individual references to nurses can be found in the country?s literature on resistance, but the profession?s responses remain obscure. This paper adds to an understanding of nursing?s ethical responses to war and strife. It presents an analysis of official nursing discourses from the longest running Dutch nursing journal, the Tijdschrift voor Ziekenverpleging (TVZ, now the Tijdschrift voor Verpleegkundigen). Articles from 1940-1945 were analyzed in terms of relevant content, manner of presentation, contexts, and silences. The silences, in particular, reflect a decidedly a-political stance, avoiding support, criticism, or endorsement of political events. A comparison with findings from a previous analysis of a comparable U. S. journal, the American Journal of Nursing, for the same period, revealed similar silences. The paper ends with a discussion of implications of the nursing profession?s voice and silences in times of political strife and war.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:19:18Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:19:18Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.name17th International Nursing Research Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_US
dc.conference.locationMontreal, Quebec, Canadaen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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