The First Weeks after Breast Cancer Diagnosis: Interventions Guided by Grounded Theory

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/153511
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The First Weeks after Breast Cancer Diagnosis: Interventions Guided by Grounded Theory
Abstract:
The First Weeks after Breast Cancer Diagnosis: Interventions Guided by Grounded Theory
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2006
Author:Lally, Robin M., RN, MS, AOCN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Minnesota
Title:Doctoral Candidate
Co-Authors:Marsha L. Lewis, PhD, RN
Purpose/Significance:  Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women worldwide. In the U.S., over 200,000 women are diagnosed annually.  Immediately post-diagnosis, women grapple with many decisions and significant stress which may adversely affect long-term adjustment, quality of life, and satisfaction if not addressed.  Thus, intervening appropriately is essential to promote successful survivorship.  Research has focused interventions on elements of the decision-making process and decision aids, with little on the context surrounding this post-diagnosis period.  The purpose of this study was to explore and conceptualize the experience of women during the immediate post-diagnosis period, developing a grounded theory to explain the context and behavior of women with breast cancer, and ultimately develop interventions meeting their needs. Setting: U.S., Midwestern, breast center. Method:  Using grounded theory method, constant comparative analysis, theoretical sampling, and memoing were utilized to identify a core category and achieve data saturation.  The sample consisted of eighteen women, ages 37 to 87 years, a mean of 12 days post-diagnosis of first breast cancer, and in the pre-operative period.  Unstructured to semi-structured interviews ranged in length from 25 to 90 minutes.  Observations and informal interviews with breast center surgeons and nurses, as well as artwork, and a survivor?s published diary also informed theory development. Results:  A three stage process of ?acclimation? (maintaining functioning in a changed environment) emerged as a basic social psychological process used by these women.  Surprisingly, women put little emphasis on gathering information or decision-making and more on maintaining self-integrity through multiple phases of this process.  Therefore, interventions aimed at guiding women through their individual, internal, mental work, such as assessing and decreasing fears and self-blame and providing strategies for interacting with others, may do more to support successful survivorship than focusing heavily on the decision process. Grant funding from:  ONS, MNRS, and University of Minnesota
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe First Weeks after Breast Cancer Diagnosis: Interventions Guided by Grounded Theoryen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/153511-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The First Weeks after Breast Cancer Diagnosis: Interventions Guided by Grounded Theory</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Lally, Robin M., RN, MS, AOCN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Minnesota</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Doctoral Candidate</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">lall0009@umn.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Marsha L. Lewis, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose/Significance:&nbsp; Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women worldwide. In the U.S., over 200,000 women are diagnosed annually.&nbsp; Immediately post-diagnosis, women grapple with many decisions and significant stress which may adversely affect long-term adjustment, quality of life, and satisfaction if not addressed.&nbsp; Thus, intervening appropriately is essential to promote successful survivorship.&nbsp; Research has focused interventions on elements of the decision-making process and decision aids, with little on the context surrounding this post-diagnosis period.&nbsp; The purpose of this study was to explore and conceptualize the experience of women during the immediate post-diagnosis period, developing a grounded theory to explain the context and behavior of women with breast cancer, and ultimately develop interventions meeting their needs. Setting: U.S., Midwestern, breast center. Method:&nbsp; Using grounded theory method, constant comparative analysis, theoretical sampling, and memoing were utilized to identify a core category and achieve data saturation.&nbsp; The sample consisted of eighteen women, ages 37 to 87 years, a mean of 12 days post-diagnosis of first breast cancer, and in the pre-operative period.&nbsp; Unstructured to semi-structured interviews ranged in length from 25 to 90 minutes.&nbsp; Observations and informal interviews with breast center surgeons and nurses, as well as artwork, and a survivor?s published diary also informed theory development. Results:&nbsp; A three stage process of ?acclimation? (maintaining functioning in a changed environment) emerged as a basic social psychological process used by these women.&nbsp; Surprisingly, women put little emphasis on gathering information or decision-making and more on maintaining self-integrity through multiple phases of this process.&nbsp; Therefore, interventions aimed at guiding women through their individual, internal, mental work, such as assessing and decreasing fears and self-blame and providing strategies for interacting with others, may do more to support successful survivorship than focusing heavily on the decision process. Grant funding from:&nbsp; ONS, MNRS, and University of Minnesota</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:19:20Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:19:20Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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