2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/153516
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Development of a Comparative Quality of Life Outcome Measure for the Elderly
Abstract:
Development of a Comparative Quality of Life Outcome Measure for the Elderly
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2006
Author:Leppa, Carol J., PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Washington, Bothell
Title:Associate Professor
The aging of the U.S. population and increasing demand for nursing home and assisted living facilities is well documented.  This phenomenon is not limited to the U.S. as medical and health care advances have increased the longevity of people around the world.  There are a variety of living facilities and care delivery programs for the elderly in many countries ranging from independent community assisted, congregate housing, to assisted-living, adult family homes and skilled care nursing homes.  While nursing care has often been carefully evaluated and monitored in these settings, the quality of life of elders in varied environments and programs has not been studied from their perspective.  Comparing facilities and programs within and across cultures is an additional challenge.  The World Health Organization (WHO) developed a Quality of Life (QOL) questionnaire in parallel forms in 16 countries.  The 100-item original (WHOQOL) and 26-item brief (WHOQOL-BREF) is designed for general populations and measures the physical, environmental, psychological, social, and spiritual domains.  Lawton?s Philadelphia Geriatric Morale Scale (PGMS) is a well tested measure of the domains of agitation, attitudes toward aging, and lonely dissatisfaction ? important elements not captured in the general quality of life measures of the WHO instruments.  This US-based instrument has been adapted for use in other cultures.  This session reports on the development and testing of an adapted instrument that incorporates the adapted WHOQOL-BREF, and the PGMS to create a reliable and valid measure of self-reported quality of life outcomes in elders that can be used to assess and compare elders experiences and outcomes across living settings, care delivery programs, and countries.  The potential for use within a facility, across types of facilities, and across cultures will be presented with specific reference to a comparison project that links the United States, the United Kingdom and Taiwan.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDevelopment of a Comparative Quality of Life Outcome Measure for the Elderlyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/153516-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Development of a Comparative Quality of Life Outcome Measure for the Elderly</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Leppa, Carol J., PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Washington, Bothell</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">leppa@u.washington.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The aging of the U.S. population and increasing demand for nursing home and assisted living facilities is well documented.&nbsp; This phenomenon is not limited to the U.S. as medical and health care advances have increased the longevity of people around the world.&nbsp; There are a variety of living facilities and care delivery programs for the elderly in many countries ranging from independent community assisted, congregate housing, to assisted-living, adult family homes and skilled care nursing homes.&nbsp; While nursing care has often been carefully evaluated and monitored in these settings, the quality of life of elders in varied environments and programs has not been studied from their perspective.&nbsp; Comparing facilities and programs within and across cultures is an additional challenge.&nbsp; The World Health Organization (WHO) developed a Quality of Life (QOL) questionnaire in parallel forms in 16 countries.&nbsp; The 100-item original (WHOQOL) and 26-item brief (WHOQOL-BREF) is designed for general populations and measures the physical, environmental, psychological, social, and spiritual domains.&nbsp;&nbsp;Lawton?s Philadelphia Geriatric Morale Scale (PGMS) is a well tested measure of the domains of agitation, attitudes toward aging, and lonely dissatisfaction ? important elements not captured in the general quality of life measures of the WHO instruments.&nbsp; This US-based instrument has been adapted for use in other cultures.&nbsp; This session reports on the development and testing of an adapted instrument that incorporates the adapted WHOQOL-BREF, and the PGMS to create a reliable and valid measure of self-reported quality of life outcomes in elders that can be used to assess and compare elders experiences and outcomes across living settings, care delivery programs, and countries. &nbsp;The potential for use within a facility, across types of facilities, and across cultures will be presented with specific reference to a comparison project that links the United States, the United Kingdom and Taiwan.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:19:33Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:19:33Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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