Managing Our Vulnerability: Taiwanese Student Nurses' Lived Experience of the Death of Their Patients

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/153522
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Managing Our Vulnerability: Taiwanese Student Nurses' Lived Experience of the Death of Their Patients
Abstract:
Managing Our Vulnerability: Taiwanese Student Nurses' Lived Experience of the Death of Their Patients
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2006
Author:Lin, Yu-Chuan, RN, MN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Tzu Chi University
Facing the death of a patient is a particularly emotionally demanding area for the student nurses. The effect of this impact extends far beyond the student nurses and into their nursing performance of the future clients. Little is known about what are the strategies of Taiwanese student nurses employed to manage their emotional strains while facing for the death of their patients. The purpose of this study was to document the managing strategies employed by Taiwanese student nurses facing for the death of their patients. Descriptive Phenomenology was employed in this study. Extensive face-to-face interviews and observations were conducted with 3 Senior student nurses at home. A total of 8 interviews were yielded during the multiple occasions of data collection. Thematic analysis guided by Giorgi (1985) and van Manen (1990) was used to analyze the text generated from the interviews and field notes. Releasing Our Vulnerability was the main theme emerged from the students? accounts. The day-to-day of Releasing Our Vulnerability was best understood in the context of five sub-themes: Not Wanting to Talk, Viewing Things in Different Light, Cherishing the Learning Experiences, Seeking Support, and Doing Exercise. The meaning units of each sub-theme offered details of student nurses? feelings, concerns, and action-oriented responses to manage their vulnerability. This study alerts nursing faculty and clinical staff that the Taiwanese student nurses employed multiple strategies to deal with their vulnerability and difficulties. It is ethically imperative to develop programs to facilitate student nurses to get through this difficult learning passage in future clinical and academic settings.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleManaging Our Vulnerability: Taiwanese Student Nurses' Lived Experience of the Death of Their Patientsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/153522-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Managing Our Vulnerability: Taiwanese Student Nurses' Lived Experience of the Death of Their Patients</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Lin, Yu-Chuan, RN, MN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Tzu Chi University</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">witch@mail.tcu.edu.tw</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Facing the death of&nbsp;a&nbsp;patient is a particularly emotionally demanding area for the student nurses. The effect of this impact extends far beyond the student nurses and into their nursing performance of the future clients. Little is known about what are the strategies of Taiwanese student nurses employed to manage their emotional strains while facing&nbsp;for the death of their&nbsp;patients. The purpose of this study was to document the managing strategies employed by Taiwanese student nurses facing for the death of their patients. Descriptive Phenomenology was employed in this study. Extensive face-to-face interviews and observations were conducted with 3 Senior student nurses at home. A total of 8 interviews were yielded during the multiple occasions of data collection. Thematic analysis guided by Giorgi (1985) and van Manen (1990) was used to analyze the text generated from the interviews and field notes. Releasing Our Vulnerability was the main theme emerged from the students? accounts. The day-to-day of Releasing Our Vulnerability was best understood in the context of five sub-themes: Not Wanting to Talk, Viewing Things in Different Light, Cherishing the Learning Experiences, Seeking Support, and Doing Exercise. The meaning units of each sub-theme offered details of student nurses? feelings, concerns, and action-oriented responses to manage their vulnerability. This study alerts nursing faculty and clinical staff that the Taiwanese student nurses employed multiple strategies to deal with their vulnerability and difficulties. It is ethically imperative to develop programs to facilitate student nurses to get through this difficult learning passage in future clinical and academic settings.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:19:47Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:19:47Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.