2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/153530
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Examing Best Practices and Outcomes of Midwifery Care
Abstract:
Examing Best Practices and Outcomes of Midwifery Care
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2004
Conference Date:July 22-24, 2004
Author:Vincent, Deborah A., PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Colorado Health Sciences Center
Title:Assistant Professor
Co-Authors:Marie Hastings-Tolsma, PhD, CNMW
Objective: The purpose of the study was to analyze outcomes associated with the nurse midwifery practice at a large metropolitan teaching hospital. Design: This study used a retrospective, descriptive study using the Nurse-Midwifery Clinical Data Set. Sample: The sample (N =510) was comprised of healthy women (37-42 weeks’ gestation) with a vertex singleton pregnancy, with an uncomplicated prenatal course, for whom a Nurse-Midwifery Clinical Data Set record existed and who delivered at the nurse midwifery faculty practice. Variables: The study examined the relationship between patient demographics, antepartum clinical factors such as parity and substance use, and the outcome measures of mode of delivery, complications, and infant APGAR score. Methods: Data were obtained from the Nurse-Midwifery Clinical Data Set by the American College of Nurse-Midwives, which includes items such as demographic data, antepartum and intrapartum care measures, and delivery outcomes. This instrument has been validated by comparisons with medical records as the criterion standard. All data were analyzed. Findings: There were weakly positive correlations for maternal outcomes and factors of age and lacerations, education level and use of instrumented delivery. There were also weakly positive correlations for birth weight and BMI and the number or prenatal visits. Conclusions: More sensitive cost and quality indicators of midwifery care need to be developed and the effect of these on outcomes needs to be elucidated. A national database that provides systematic data on nurse midwifery care as well as other obstetric care providers would be useful in providing comparative analyses and developing obstetrical best care practices. Implications: Specific differences in the nurse-midwifery care needs to be clarified and the effect of these differences on outcomes needs to be elucidated. A national database of indicators relevant to midwifery and other obstetric providers is needed to benchmark best practices for obstetrical care.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
22-Jul-2004
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleExaming Best Practices and Outcomes of Midwifery Careen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/153530-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Examing Best Practices and Outcomes of Midwifery Care</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July 22-24, 2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Vincent, Deborah A., PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Colorado Health Sciences Center</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">deborah.vincent@uchsc.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Marie Hastings-Tolsma, PhD, CNMW</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: The purpose of the study was to analyze outcomes associated with the nurse midwifery practice at a large metropolitan teaching hospital. Design: This study used a retrospective, descriptive study using the Nurse-Midwifery Clinical Data Set. Sample: The sample (N =510) was comprised of healthy women (37-42 weeks&rsquo; gestation) with a vertex singleton pregnancy, with an uncomplicated prenatal course, for whom a Nurse-Midwifery Clinical Data Set record existed and who delivered at the nurse midwifery faculty practice. Variables: The study examined the relationship between patient demographics, antepartum clinical factors such as parity and substance use, and the outcome measures of mode of delivery, complications, and infant APGAR score. Methods: Data were obtained from the Nurse-Midwifery Clinical Data Set by the American College of Nurse-Midwives, which includes items such as demographic data, antepartum and intrapartum care measures, and delivery outcomes. This instrument has been validated by comparisons with medical records as the criterion standard. All data were analyzed. Findings: There were weakly positive correlations for maternal outcomes and factors of age and lacerations, education level and use of instrumented delivery. There were also weakly positive correlations for birth weight and BMI and the number or prenatal visits. Conclusions: More sensitive cost and quality indicators of midwifery care need to be developed and the effect of these on outcomes needs to be elucidated. A national database that provides systematic data on nurse midwifery care as well as other obstetric care providers would be useful in providing comparative analyses and developing obstetrical best care practices. Implications: Specific differences in the nurse-midwifery care needs to be clarified and the effect of these differences on outcomes needs to be elucidated. A national database of indicators relevant to midwifery and other obstetric providers is needed to benchmark best practices for obstetrical care.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:20:08Z-
dc.date.issued2004-07-22en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:20:08Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.