Self-Efficacy Expectations and Functional Ability in Everyday Activities in Clients Undergoing Total Knee Arthroplasty

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/153532
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Self-Efficacy Expectations and Functional Ability in Everyday Activities in Clients Undergoing Total Knee Arthroplasty
Abstract:
Self-Efficacy Expectations and Functional Ability in Everyday Activities in Clients Undergoing Total Knee Arthroplasty
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2004
Conference Date:July 22-24, 2004
Author:Wallace, Linda, EdD, MSN, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Indiana University Kokomo
Title:Associate Professor and Director of International Studies
Objective: Examine the effects of interventions on self-efficacy and of self-efficacy on functional ability in clients undergoing elective, primary, unilateral, total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Design: Longitudinal, descriptive study based on Bandura's self-efficacy theory (1977). Sample: Convenience sample of 31 clients. Intervention and Outcome Variables: Examined effect of interventions (attending a joint replacement class and a physical therapy session, performing exercises, reading educational materials) on self-efficacy (confidence in ability to perform activities required for discharge home) and of self-efficacy on improvement in functional status and perceived health status. Methods: Self-efficacy (setting-specific questionnaires) and perceived health status (Western Ontario McMasters University Osteoarthritis Index) were assessed: (a) when client was scheduled for surgery, (b) just prior to surgery, and (c) six weeks after surgery. Findings: Significant correlations were found between pre-education self-efficacy, improvement in self-efficacy (r = -.639, p = .000, n= 33) and post-education self-efficacy (r = .513, p = .002, n= 33); and between post-education self-efficacy, outcome expectations (r = .389, p = .031, n= 31), and pain relief following TKA (r = -.476, p = .007, n= 31). Participants with lower pre-education self-efficacy showed the most improvement in self-efficacy. Higher self-efficacy scores correlated with greater pain relief. The greatest difference in mean self-efficacy scores (37.77) occurred between participants who were “unsure” and participants who were “very sure” TKA was necessary. Conclusions: Higher self-efficacy scores were associated with more expected benefits, previous TKA, and greater pain relief. Shorter lengths of hospital stay were associated with greater joint stiffness reduction, younger age and previous TKA. Participants that were “very sure” of the need for TKA exhibited the highest self-efficacy scores. Implications: This study highlighted the need for refinement of context sensitive self-efficacy instruments, more sophisticated means of assessing the impact of information sources and more longitudinal studies with larger sample sizes.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
22-Jul-2004
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSelf-Efficacy Expectations and Functional Ability in Everyday Activities in Clients Undergoing Total Knee Arthroplastyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/153532-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Self-Efficacy Expectations and Functional Ability in Everyday Activities in Clients Undergoing Total Knee Arthroplasty</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July 22-24, 2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Wallace, Linda, EdD, MSN, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Indiana University Kokomo</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor and Director of International Studies</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">lwallace@iuk.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: Examine the effects of interventions on self-efficacy and of self-efficacy on functional ability in clients undergoing elective, primary, unilateral, total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Design: Longitudinal, descriptive study based on Bandura's self-efficacy theory (1977). Sample: Convenience sample of 31 clients. Intervention and Outcome Variables: Examined effect of interventions (attending a joint replacement class and a physical therapy session, performing exercises, reading educational materials) on self-efficacy (confidence in ability to perform activities required for discharge home) and of self-efficacy on improvement in functional status and perceived health status. Methods: Self-efficacy (setting-specific questionnaires) and perceived health status (Western Ontario McMasters University Osteoarthritis Index) were assessed: (a) when client was scheduled for surgery, (b) just prior to surgery, and (c) six weeks after surgery. Findings: Significant correlations were found between pre-education self-efficacy, improvement in self-efficacy (r = -.639, p = .000, n= 33) and post-education self-efficacy (r = .513, p = .002, n= 33); and between post-education self-efficacy, outcome expectations (r = .389, p = .031, n= 31), and pain relief following TKA (r = -.476, p = .007, n= 31). Participants with lower pre-education self-efficacy showed the most improvement in self-efficacy. Higher self-efficacy scores correlated with greater pain relief. The greatest difference in mean self-efficacy scores (37.77) occurred between participants who were &ldquo;unsure&rdquo; and participants who were &ldquo;very sure&rdquo; TKA was necessary. Conclusions: Higher self-efficacy scores were associated with more expected benefits, previous TKA, and greater pain relief. Shorter lengths of hospital stay were associated with greater joint stiffness reduction, younger age and previous TKA. Participants that were &ldquo;very sure&rdquo; of the need for TKA exhibited the highest self-efficacy scores. Implications: This study highlighted the need for refinement of context sensitive self-efficacy instruments, more sophisticated means of assessing the impact of information sources and more longitudinal studies with larger sample sizes.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:20:13Z-
dc.date.issued2004-07-22en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:20:13Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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