2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/153540
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Measuring Knowledge Utilization in Health Care
Abstract:
Measuring Knowledge Utilization in Health Care
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2004
Conference Date:July 21, 2004
Author:Estabrooks, Carole A., PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Alberta
Title:Associate Professor
Co-Authors:Lars Wallin, PhD, RN; F. Margaret Milner, BScN
Objective: In this presentation we address the need for methodological advances in the research utilization field, focusing on the area of measurement. Unresolved measurement challenges present an important and practical problem. Methods: A systematic literature review and evaluation of the tools that are currently used to measure research utilization in nursing was undertaken in order to (1) briefly review the concept of research utilization and its meanings, (2) review the requirements of good measurement instruments, (3) review existing research utilization instruments, and (4) discuss implications and future requirements for scholarship in this field. Specifically, we included studies that narrowed our focus to the actual use of research in practice and articles that reported the development or use of an instrument. Findings: Common problems in measuring research utilization included lack of research utilization (or other appropriate) theory, lack of construct clarity, lack of explicit measurement theory, lack of advanced psychometric assessment, a presumption of linearity in the change process, an absence of longitudinal work (neither repeated measurement or frequent use of any instrument) and several potentially influential but unacknowledged assumptions. Second, these instruments were also commonly susceptible to a number of other problems, including self-report and recall biases, social desirability biases, under-developed scaling approaches, and lack of clarity regarding the unit of analysis. Conclusion & Implications: An inability to adequately measure research utilization calls into question studies that claim to demonstrate either its cause or its effects. Methodological advances in the research utilization field are required in order to advance the field and achieve better prerequisites to understand the implementation process of new knowledge into practice.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
21-Jul-2004
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMeasuring Knowledge Utilization in Health Careen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/153540-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Measuring Knowledge Utilization in Health Care</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July 21, 2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Estabrooks, Carole A., PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Alberta</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">carole.estabrooks@ualberta.ca</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Lars Wallin, PhD, RN; F. Margaret Milner, BScN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: In this presentation we address the need for methodological advances in the research utilization field, focusing on the area of measurement. Unresolved measurement challenges present an important and practical problem. Methods: A systematic literature review and evaluation of the tools that are currently used to measure research utilization in nursing was undertaken in order to (1) briefly review the concept of research utilization and its meanings, (2) review the requirements of good measurement instruments, (3) review existing research utilization instruments, and (4) discuss implications and future requirements for scholarship in this field. Specifically, we included studies that narrowed our focus to the actual use of research in practice and articles that reported the development or use of an instrument. Findings: Common problems in measuring research utilization included lack of research utilization (or other appropriate) theory, lack of construct clarity, lack of explicit measurement theory, lack of advanced psychometric assessment, a presumption of linearity in the change process, an absence of longitudinal work (neither repeated measurement or frequent use of any instrument) and several potentially influential but unacknowledged assumptions. Second, these instruments were also commonly susceptible to a number of other problems, including self-report and recall biases, social desirability biases, under-developed scaling approaches, and lack of clarity regarding the unit of analysis. Conclusion &amp; Implications: An inability to adequately measure research utilization calls into question studies that claim to demonstrate either its cause or its effects. Methodological advances in the research utilization field are required in order to advance the field and achieve better prerequisites to understand the implementation process of new knowledge into practice.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:20:32Z-
dc.date.issued2004-07-21en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:20:32Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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